A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Table of contents

Please remember to read the 'How to use this guide' page to get the most out of the guide.

You may find it easier to use the interactive mechanism search function. It is also available for download as a pdf (see below).

Related file(s): 

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Book cover image

Compiled by Andreas Speck
Published by War Resisters' International, Quaker United Nations Office Geneva, Conscience and Peace Tax International and the CCPR Centre
ISBN 978-0-903517-25-6

(c) 2012

CC Lincense

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System by http://co-guide.org is licensed under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/deed.en_US

Related file(s): 

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Foreword

The international human rights system is not always easy to understand. It can be difficult to assess the possible benefits of using one process rather than another, and this often prevents campaigners unfamiliar with these systems from using them. With this in mind, in 2000 the Quaker UN Office, Geneva, and War Resisters' International published A Conscientious Objectors Guide to the UN Human Rights System written by Emily Miles. In the year 2000, there was little explicit reference to conscientious objection to military service.

Since that time, the understanding and recognition of conscientious objection to military service has moved forward dramatically. In particular, the UN Human Rights Committee has made clear that it is protected as an inherent part of the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and that States must provide for conscientious objectors. Following this, the European Court of Human Rights, which has binding legal powers over Council of Europe States, has issued a series of judgements also recognising that conscientious objection to military service is protected under that Convention.

These breakthroughs mean that there is now a solid legal basis to which States can be held, and which can also be used by other international and regional bodies and procedures for their own work on this issue.

At the same time, these positive developments have meant that it was necessary to expand this updated version of the Guide to encompass the regional human rights systems as well as the United Nations. Fortunately, having an on-line version means that it is readily searchable and material can be accessed via weblinks, meaning that - although longer - it should be easier to use. This is important as each part of each system has its own particularities and requirements.

The main purpose is to guide individuals and organisations wishing to raise issues and cases about conscientious objection in what the possibilities are, how to use them, and the likely advantages and disadvantages of the different procedures. We hope that, in breaking down the steps involved, these mechanisms become more approachable.

The major steps forward that have occurred have resulted not only from individual actions, but from the greater awareness and understanding developed within these systems through having to consider cases and issues arising from different countries and regions. In addition, the greater visibility arising because of the judgements, opinions, views, concluding observations and reports issued as a result also contribute to a broader knowledge and understanding, including by people and within countries who might not previously been aware of conscientious objection to military service, and why it is important.

I commend this Guide to all those working on conscientious objection to military service and look forward to seeing the results.

Rachel Brett

December 2012

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

About this guide

This guide updates and expands the publication A Conscientious Objectors Guide to the UN Human Rights System, published jointly by War Resisters' International and the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva, in 2000, and compiled by Emily Miles. The initial publication was extremely useful in raising awareness about the use of the United Nations human rights system to advance the right to conscientious objection to military service, and to protect conscientious objectors from persecution.

However, there have been a number of advancements in relation to the right to conscientious objection to military service since the initial publication, which made an update necessary. The most important of these has been the United Nations Human Rights Committee decision in the case of the complaint by Yeo-Bum Yoon and Myung-Jin Choi vs. Republik of Korea from January 2007, in which the Human Rights Committee for the first time explicitly recognised the right to conscientious objection to military service. Other UN mechanisms too have increasingly dealt with conscientious objection to military service, creating a wealth of opinions and jurisprudence recognising the right to conscientious objection.

Initial discussions between War Resisters' International and the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva, about updating the 2000 Guide go back to 2008. It quickly became clear that a simple update of the UN system would not be sufficient. In their work with human rights and conscientious objection organisations from all parts of the world, both, War Resisters' International and the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva, often a lack of comparative knowledge of the different regional and international human rights mechanisms, and tendency to do “the usual” - meaning to use the regional or international system usually used by NGOs from a respective country, irrespective of whether or not the system had a good track record on conscientious objection to military service. Both organisations therefore felt that a comparative overview of the United Nations' and regional human rights systems would be needed, to enable conscientious objectors, their organisations and human rights NGOs to make an informed choice which system to use.

Work on this guide began in 2010, thanks to a generous grant by the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust. In addition to WRI and QUNO, Geneva, it was possible to involve Conscience and Peace Tax International (CPTI) as another international NGO working on conscientious objection, and the Centre on Civil and Political Rights (CCPR Centre) as an organisation supporting NGOs in working with the United Nations Human Rights Committee.

This Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System is mainly intended as a web publication (see http://co-guide.org), which allows users a quick overview of relevant human rights mechanisms applicable to their situation. While it can be read as a book, its main use is as an interactive guide. It is aimed at conscientious objectors to military service anywhere in the world who struggle for the recognition of their right to conscientious objection, or against discrimination for being a conscientious objector, and who want to use international or regional human rights systems in their struggle. It can also be used by local or national organisations of conscientious objectors to military service, or by human rights NGOs supporting conscientious objectors to help them to access international or regional human rights systems.

Some human rights mechanisms can be used in individual cases of human rights violations – the prosecution or imprisonment of a conscientious objector to military service, or an individual case of discrimination. Others are more suitable for highlighting state law (and the lack of recognition of the right to conscientious objection) or state practice, and for putting pressure on the State to comply with international human rights standards.

Human rights – and human rights systems – are dynamic and evolving. While every effort has been made to provide accurate descriptions of the human rights mechanisms included in this guide, and to include all relevant jurisprudence, we can not guarantee that all information remains correct. We therefore recommend to use this as a guide, and not as a reference book, and to always check the official website of the different mechanisms before making a submission.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Acknowledgements

This Guide would not have been possible without the support of many people who helped shape the idea, and commented on drafts. Christopher Eduard Bösch did some initial research and wrote very first drafts of especially some of United Nations chapter. Rachel Brett, Derek Brett, Peggy Brett and Patrick Mutzenberg helped to shape the idea and provided comments on many of the chapters.

Albert Beale did a lot of the proofreading, to turn this publication – as much as possible – into proper English.

Boro Kitanoski helped with the graphics on pages 42 and 56.

Netuxo Ltd did a great job on the development of the website at http://co-guide.org, also available under http://co-guide.info.

My colleagues in the WRI office and the WRI Executive had to cope with my frustrations and complaints about the work on this Guide, and the delay this caused to other important WRI work.

And last but not least, special thanks go to the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust, who did not only provide the funding for this publication, but also for WRI's Right to Refuse to Kill programme.

Andreas Speck, December 2012

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Acronyms

AU: African Union
ACHPR: African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights
ACHR: American Convention on Human Rights
ACRWC: African Charter on Rights and Welfare of the Child
ACERWC: African Committee of Experts on Rights and Welfare of the Child
CAT: Committee Against Torture
CCPR: Human Rights Committee (Committee on Civil and Political Rights - CCPR)
CERD: Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
CESR: Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
CHR: Commission on Human Rights (until 2006)
CM: Committee of Ministers (of the Council of Europe)
CO: conscientious objector, conscientious objection to military service
CoE: Council of Europe
COMESA: Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa
CRC: Convention on the Rights of the Child
CRTF: Country Report Task Force. See Human Rights Committee
CSO: Civil Society Organisation
EAC: East African Community
EACJ: East African Court of Justice
ECHR: European Court of Human Rights
ECOSOC: UN Economic and Social Council
ECOWAS: Economic Community Of West African States
ECSR: European Committee of Social Rights
EU: European Union
EUSR: European Union Special Representative
FRA: European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights
HRC: Human Rights Council
IACHR: Inter-American Commission on Human Rights
ICESCR: International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
ICCPR: International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
ICESCR: International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
NGO: Non-Governmental organisation
OAS: Organization of American States
ODIHR: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights
OHCHR: Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights
OIJ: Organización Iberoamericana de Juventud – Ibero-American Youth Organisation
OPAC: Optional Protocol on Children in Armed Conflict (OP2)
OPSC: Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children (OP1)
OSCE: Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe
OP: Operative Paragraph
PP: Preambular Paragraph
SADC: Southern African Development Community
SR: Special Rapporteur
UDHR: Universal Declaration of Human Rights
UN: United Nations
UNHCR: (Office of) United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
UNHRC: United Nations Human Rights Council
UPR: Universal Periodic Review
WGAD: Working Group on Arbitrary Detention

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Conscientious objection to military service – can international human rights systems help?

Although human rights systems will not provide solutions to all problems related with conscientious objection to military service, they can be of help in certain situations. However, it is important to be realistic, and not to expect that human rights – and international human rights systems – can solve the social and political problems of war and militarism.

There are many motivations for conscientious objection to military service. Most conscientious objectors strive for a society free of war and militarism. The vast majority of conscientious objectors do not only want to be exempted from military service, but see their conscientious objection in the context of a social and political struggle against war and militarism, and for a more just and peaceful society. The use of human rights systems can never be a substitute for this necessary struggle – but it can add a different dimension, it can help to protect conscientious objectors to military service, and it can contribute to the legal recognition of the right to conscientious objection to military service.

When using human rights systems, it is important to be aware of their limitations, of what they can achieve and what not. Bearing this in mind, international and regional human rights system can be an important tool for conscientious objectors to military service and their movements, and for NGOs supporting conscientious objectors.

The different international and regional human rights systems play a role in monitoring State practice of human rights, including the right to conscientious objection. This role can be beneficial for the lobbying of national governments and authorities, and to argue cases in national courts, up to the national Constitutional or Supreme Court.

This guide describes the way how you can use the different human rights systems, and which system might be the most promising one to use, when the right to conscientious objection has not been recognised or has been implemented in an unfair manner.

The right to conscientious objection in the different human rights systems

Although the right to conscientious objection is not explicitly mentioned in any of the key human rights treaties (with the exception of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights) – globally (the United Nations) or regionally – it has often been recognised as a right.

United Nations human rights system

The United Nations system has recognised conscientious objection as an inherent part of the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and the different parts of the United Nations system – especially the Human Rights Council building on the work of the former Human Rights Commission, and the Human Rights Committee through its Concluding Observations and Views on individual cases have developed a set of standards in relation to the right to conscientious objection to military service, which can be used to lobby national authorities and to argue in national courts.

The European systems

Especially the Council of Europe took up the right to conscientious objection quite early – well before any other system – with its Recommendation 478 (1967) from 26 January 1967. However, in the end it lagged behind the UN system, and only in 2011 did the European Court of Human Rights recognise the right to conscientious objection as a manifestation of freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

The Inter-American system

The Inter-American human rights system is presently less advanced. Although the American Convention on Human Rights also recognises the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, the Inter-American Human Rights Commission has so far not explicitly recognised the right to conscientious objection as protected under this provision. In fact, the jurisprudence of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission has so far been disappointing.

The African human rights systems

The different African human rights systems – be it the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights or the ECOWAS Community Court of Justice, or any other – have so for not dealt with the question of conscientious objection to military service. While article 8 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights also protects the right to freedom of conscience – and analogous to the similar provisions in the International Covenant, the European Convention, or the American Convention should therefore also include the right to conscientious objection to military service – this has so far not been tested.

Even though the different human rights systems are formally independent, they nevertheless do relate to each other. Advances in one system – e.g. the United Nations system – can be used to advance another system, and this is important when choosing which mechanism to use. Each of the many different mechanisms has its advantages and disadvantages, and might be more or less advanced on the concrete issue in question, and this can make the choice of mechanism more complicated. Hopefully, this guide will help to make the choice easier by giving a comprehensive overview.

Finally a word of warning: although many human rights mechanisms might be judicial or quasi-judicial mechanisms – others are clearly political, such as the United Nations Human Rights Council – they do not necessarily in a political vacuum. Just have the “right” legal arguments might not always be sufficient to win a case, especially when it comes to overturning existing jurisprudence, setting a new precedent or developing new human rights standards. It is therefore important to “play” the different human rights systems intelligently, and to get in touch with the organisations listed here (or use the contact form) if you want to engage in changing jurisprudence or standards setting. Trial and error might be a nice tactic in many areas of daily life, but not when it comes to human rights, as negative jurisprudence can make progress more difficult for others for decades to come.

To conclude, while the different human rights mechanisms presented in this guide will not bring about a demilitarised world - that's well beyond their mandate – they can make the lives of conscientious objectors safer and easier, and this is a worthwhile goal in itself. It can then free up energy and resources for the social and political struggle and war and militarisms, and for a more peaceful and just world.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

The United Nations

The different bodies of the United Nations have repeatedly dealt with the question of conscientious objection to military service. The UN General Assembly resolution on the “Status of persons refusing service in military or police forces used to enforce apartheid (Resolution 33/165)” from 20 December 1978 recognised “the right of all persons to refuse service in military or police forces which are used to enforce apartheid”.

Both, the former Commission on Human Rights, and the Human Rights Council, which replaced the Commission in 2006, have recognised the right to conscientious objection in numerous resolutions since 1987, with the Human Rights Council reaffirming the resolutions of the former Commission on Human Rights in its resolution from 5 July 2012.

The issue of conscientious objection to military service is repeatedly taken up during the Universal Periodic Review of all member States of the United Nations within the framework of the Human Rights Council. In addition, several of the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council are relevant to the question of conscientious objection, especially:

An overview of some other potentially relevant Special Procedures is given on this page.

Two human rights treaties are especially relevant for conscientious objectors to military service:

  • the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which is overseen by the Human Rights Committee. Article 18 of the ICCPR recognises the freedom of thought, conscience and religion, and the interpretations and jurisprudence of the Human Rights Committee have established that this includes the right to conscientious objection to military service.
  • the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the Optional Protocol on Children in Armed Conflict do not directly deal with conscientious objection, but are relevant in relation to the recruitment of under-18s.

In addition, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and its country presences can be of use to conscientious objectors.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos (OACDH)

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos (OACDH) está encargada de la dirección del programa de derechos humanos de la ONU, y de la promoción y protección de todos los derechos humanos establecidos en la Carta de las Naciones Unidas y la ley de derechos humanos.

El Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos es el funcionario de mayor grado en materia de derechos humanos: dirige la OACDH y encabeza las labores de la ONU en materia de derechos humanos.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos proporciona apoyo de secretaría a los nueve órganos de derechos humanos centrales ligados a tratados, incluido el Comité de Derechos Humanos, el Comité de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, y el Consejo de Derechos Humanos, junto con sus mecanismos subsidiarios como el Comité Asesor, el Examen Periódico Universal y los dos Grupos de Trabajo formados en el marco del Procedimiento de Denuncia del Consejo de Derechos Humanos: el Grupo de Trabajo de Comunicaciones y el Grupo de Trabajo de Situaciones. En estas funciones, recibe comunicaciones, las reenvía al Estado en cuestión y entabla diálogo con el objetivo de asegurar el respeto a los derechos humanos estipulado en los tratados internacionales.

La OACDH también puede ser un actor internacional importante para la protección de los derechos humanos, incluido el derecho a la objeción de conciencia. Esto es así sobre todo cuando la OADCH está presente en un país mediante sus oficinas nacionales o regionales.

Actualmente, la OACDH tiene oficinas en Bolivia, Camboya, Colombia, Guatemala, Guinea, Mauritania, México, Nepal, los Territorios Ocupados Palestinos (oficina autónoma), Kosovo (Serbia), Togo y Uganda. Los detalles de las oficinas nacionales pueden encontrarse en la siguiente página web: http://www.ohchr.org/SP/Countries/Pages/CountryOfficesIndex.aspx

La OACDH tiene 12 oficinas/sedes regionales que cubren África Oriental (Addis Abeba), África Austral (Pretoria), África Occidental (Dakar), América Central (Panamá), América del Sur (Santiago de Chile), Europa (Bruselas), Asía Central (Bishkek), Sudeste asiático (Bangkok), Pacífico (Suva) y Oriente Próximo (Beirut). Los detalles de las oficinas regionales pueden encontrarse en esta página web: http://www.ohchr.org/SP/Countries/Pages/RegionalOfficesIndex.aspx

Tanto las oficinas nacionales como las regionales trabajan en la promoción y protección de los derechos humanos, y cooperan también con ONG. La información que reciben será usada para la elaboración del informe de la OACDH como parte del Examen Periódico Universal (ver a continuación). En caso de presencia nacional o regional, puede ser muy útil establecer relación con la oficina adecuada de la OACDH, y mantenerla informada de la situación y de los casos individuales.

La OACDH también coordina los programas de educación e información pública sobre derechos humanos de las Naciones Unidas.

Persona(s) a cargo

Septiembre de 2008 – actualidad: Ms. Navanethem Pillay

Datos de contacto: 
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Palais Wilson 52 rue des Pâquis CH-1201 Geneva, Switzerland Telephone: +41 22 917 9220 E-mail: InfoDesk@ohchr.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
Reference texts

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité de Derechos Humanos Procedimiento de presentación de informes por los Estados

Resumen

El Comité de Derechos Humanos (denominado en lo que sigue Comité de DH o Comité) es un mecanismo basado en un tratado que monitoriza la implementación del Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos (PIDCP) (ver http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/ccpr.htm) por los Estados firmantes. Esto es llevado a cabo mediante el examen de informes periódicos de los Estados firmantes (ver http://treaties.un.org/pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&chapter=4&lang=en). El informe es examinado mediante un diálogo de seis horas (informes periódicos) o de nueve horas (informes iniciales) entre el Comité y representantes del Estado. Durante el diálogo, los miembros del Comité pueden plantear cualquier tema relacionado con los derechos civiles o políticos, además de derechos no tratados en el informe del Estado. Tras el diálogo, el Comité emite unas Observaciones Finales, que proponen recomendaciones y valoran la práctica y la legislación del Estado.

El Comité se ocupa de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar de acuerdo al artículo 18 del PIDCP.

1. Resultados probables de la utilización de este mecanismo

Durante el examen del informe del Estado, los miembros del Comité pueden también plantear cuestiones relacionadas con la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Si el Comité llega a la conclusión de que las prácticas del Estado incumplen el PIDCP, esto será subrayado en sus Observaciones Finales en forma de preocupaciones y recomendaciones. Si el Estado reaparece ante el Comité, éste muy probablemente preguntará al Estado por las mejoras que ha hecho.

En algunos casos, puede ser elegido el tema de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar para los procedimientos de seguimiento del Comité.

Las Observaciones Finales pueden ser incluidas también en la recopilación de información de la ONU preparada para el Examen Periódico Universal.

2. ¿A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo?

El mecanismo es aplicable a aquellos Estados que hayan ratificado o aceptado el PIDCP. La situación de las ratificaciones puede consultarse en:
http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&c....

3. ¿Quién puede presentar información?

Todo el mundo, incluidas las ONG sin estatuto consultivo de ECOSOC y personas individuales.

4. ¿Cuándo presentar la información?

Información para la Lista de Asuntos:

La Lista de Asuntos es un documento elaborado por el Comité en base al informe del Estado e información de otras fuentes con el objetivo de subrayar los principales asuntos o preocupaciones del Comité para el examen. La Lista de Asuntos se envía al Estado varios meses antes del diálogo para que el Estado pueda preparar respuestas. Estas respuestas forman el punto de partida para el diálogo entre el Comité y el Estado. Es por ello importante enviar información antes de la elaboración de la Lista de Asuntos para asegurarse de que se incluye la cuestión de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar en la Lista de Asuntos y es por tanto tratada durante todo el proceso de examen.

La Lista de Asuntos es redactada por el Grupo de Tareas sobre Informes de País con el apoyo de la OACDH con al menos dos meses de antelación a la sesión en la que está programado que sea aprobada.

La información de los plazos puede consultarse aquí: http://www.ccprcentre.org/es/siguientes-sesiones/.

Las solicitudes realizadas después de la elaboración de la Lista de Asuntos pueden ser tenidas en cuenta durante el diálogo.

Información para los informes estándar:

Tras la elaboración de la Lista de Asuntos todavía merece la pena enviar información para el examen del informe del Estado. Debería contener referencias a la Lista de Asuntos si se encuentra incluido en ésta el tema de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Si el Estado ha enviado sus respuestas escritas a la Lista de Asuntos con antelación, es posible hacer referencia a éstas. Sin embargo, el Estado no está obligado a proporcionar sus respuestas escritas con antelación, por lo que las ONG no deberían esperar a las respuestas por escrito antes de preparar sus solicitudes.

Si en la Lista de Asuntos no está incluida la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, las ONG deben preparar un breve informe explicando los asuntos con vistas a conseguir que sean adecuadamente tratados durante el diálogo con el Estado. La información debería ser enviada como muy tarde dos semanas antes del inicio de la sesión en la que será examinado el informe del Estado.

Las ONG deben subrayar en sus informes los errores u omisiones apreciadas en la información suministrada por el Estado. Los informes de los Estados son públicos y accesibles en línea en está dirección: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/sessions.htm (ingles). Si no es así, puede que haya que solicitarlo del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores del país en cuestión o, si no es posible, de la secretaría del Comité de Derechos Humanos de la ONU. Debido a la acumulación de informes de los Estados, habitualmente hay un retraso de alrededor de un año entre la presentación del informe del Estado y el inicio de su examen por parte del Comité.

Una vez está disponible el informe del Estado, se recomiendo consultar en línea cuándo es probable que sea tratado:
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/sessions.htm (ingles) o http://www.ccprcentre.org/es/siguientes-sesiones/.

Información del Procedimiento Facultativo de Presentación de Informes

En octubre de 2009, el Comité de Derechos Humanos introdujo un nuevo Procedimiento Facultativo de Presentación de Informes (también llamado procedimiento LOIPR), basado en una Lista de Asuntos Previa a la Presentación de Informes(LOIPR, por sus siglas en inglés). En noviembre de 2010 empezó un periodo piloto de cinco años de duración.

El Procedimiento Facultativo de Presentación de Informes es opcional, como indica su nombre. Un Estado puede seguir enviando un informe periódico completo, o el Comité puede solicitar un informe completo “cuando se considere que determinadas circunstancias exijan un informe completo, incluido cuando haya ocurrido un cambio fundamental en el enfoque legal y político de la parte estatal que afecte a derechos incluidos en el Pacto; en tal caso puede solicitarse un informe completo artículo por artículo.

La Oficina del Alto Comisionado para los Derechos Humanos publicará una lista de los Estados que informan siguiendo el procedimiento LOIPR cuando sea posible, al menos 9 meses antes de la sesión durante la cual el Comité aprobará la LOIPR. Esto da a las ONG la oportunidad de presentar su información antes de la adopción de la Lista de Asuntos Previa a la Presentación de Informes.

5. ¿Consejos especiales para presentar informes a este mecanismo?

Estructura del informe

La información siguiente se aplica a los informes que sólo traten de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Si estamos preparando un informe más extenso que cubra múltiples asuntos, se recomienda consultar las Directrices para ONG del Centro para los Derechos Civiles y Políticos sobre la Participación en la Presentación de Informes ante el Comité de Derechos Humanos: (http://ccprcentre.org/doc/CCPR/Handbook/CCPR_Guidelines%20for%20NGOS_es%...)

Introducción

La introducción debería incluir un presentación de la ONG (incluyendo los detalles de contacto) que presenta el informe e información relevante sobre el contexto general, como el contexto histórico, situaciones concretas (p. e. conflicto armado o contexto socioeconómico), sin repetir la información contenida en el informe del Estado.

Parte sustancial

La información suministrada en el informe debería estar relacionada directamente con un análisis de la puesta en práctica del Pacto, con indicaciones claras de qué artículos están siendo incumplidos, de qué manera, y las consecuencias que esto tiene. Puede ser útil referirse a interpretaciones ya establecidas sobre lo que constituye un incumplimiento de Pacto, p. e. el Comentario General 22.
También revisar y analizar en qué medida cumplen el Pacto las leyes, políticas nacionales de la parte estatal. Debería prestarse especial atención a la distancia entre las leyes nacionales y su puesta en práctica.
Las solicitudes escritas de las ONG deben ser objetivas, por lo que es recomendable reconocer cualquier mejora, como por ejemplo medidas positivas adoptadas por el Estado para implementar el Pacto. Puede ser útil en los informes de las ONG ilustrar sus descubrimientos con casos que muestren concretamente cómo las autoridades no ponen en práctica el PIDCP. Los precedentes deben ser actualizados con los procedimientos judiciales más recientes y otras informaciones relevantes, como fechas y fuentes. Las ONG deben asegurarse de que la credibilidad de la información proporcionada no pueda ser puesta en duda.
Vale la pena recordar al Comité sus Conclusiones Finales cuando sean relevantes.

Conclusiones y recomendaciones

Al final del informe es recomendable incluir una lista de preguntas acerca de la legislación o prácticas nacionales que nos gustaría que el Comité realizara al gobierno.
Muchas ONG incluyen recomendaciones en sus informes que les gustaría ver reflejadas en las Observaciones Finales del Comité. Las recomendaciones deben ser concretas, realistas y orientadas a la adopción de medidas. También pueden hacerse recomendaciones teniendo en cuenta el papel de las ONG en la implementación de las Observaciones Finales. Sin embargo, otros, como la Internacional de Resistentes a la Guerra, no incluyen recomendaciones y se centran en la crítica de las violaciones del PIDCP.

Referencia al informe del Estado y las anteriores Observaciones Finales

Las ONG deben indicar si su información corrobora, complementa o contradice la información suministrada por el informe del Estado. Debería señalarse también si el Estado no ha tratado la cuestión en absoluto.

Las Observaciones Finales adoptadas por el Comité de Derechos Humanos tras el examen del anterior informe del Estado también deben ser tenidas en cuenta por las ONG cuando empiezan a redactar sus informes, puesto que uno de los objetivos del Comité es supervisar en qué medida han sido implementadas sus recomendaciones anteriores. Es extremadamente importante valorar si las autoridades han realizado algún progreso relacionado con las anteriores Observaciones Finales. Cuando las ONG consideren que no se ha producido en relación a las recomendaciones del Comité de Derechos Humanos deben mencionarlo claramente. Puede ser también muy útil consultar los resúmenes de las conversaciones que tuvieron lugar durante la valoración del informe anterior por parte del Comité, así como las respuestas escritas o comentarios (en caso de que existan) presentados por el Estado en respuesta a las anteriores recomendaciones del Comité. Ambas están disponibles en el sitio web de la OACDH, y en el Centro para los Derechos Civiles y Políticos (CCPR): http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrc/followup-procedure.htm.

También debemos valorar la posibilidad de elaborar una nota de prensa haciendo público que hemos presentado el informe y enviar copias a quienes pensemos que deberían verla, incluidas otras partes de la maquinaria de derechos humanos de la ONU.

Confidencialidad

Habitualmente la información de la ONG enviada al Comité de Derechos Humanos se hace pública en el sitio web de la OACDH, siempre que la ONG esté de acuerdo. Esto significa que los informes son accesibles también para la parte estatal. Esto no debería olvidarse, sobre todo en el caso de las ONG procedentes de países donde la sociedad civil no puede trabajar con libertad y sufre acoso por parte de las autoridades. Aunque es posible optar por que la información no se publique en el sitio web de la OACDH, el Comité de Derechos Humanos no puede negarse a entregar la información si la solicita un Estado.

Si nos preocupa la confidencialidad, debemos ponernos en contacto con el CCPR para asesorarnos.

Idioma

Los informes de las ONG deben presentarse en uno o más de los idiomas de trabajo del Comité de Derechos Humanos: inglés, francés y español. Si no puede traducirse todo el informe, las ONG deben valorar la preparación de un breve resumen ejecutivo en los tres idiomas.
Naturalmente, toda la información presentada debe ser lo más concisa posible.

Hacer presión durante la sesión

Todo el mundo puede asistir en calidad de observador a las sesiones del Comité, aunque antes hay que solicitar acreditación a la secretaría.
La asistencia a la sesión en que se examina el informe del Estado es muy importante, ya que permite a las ONG reaccionar a la información suministrada por los representantes del Estado. En caso necesario, las ONG deben estar preparadas para proporcionar reacciones informales a los miembros del Comité cuando las afirmaciones realizadas por los representantes del Estado parezcan irrelevantes o imprecisas. Aunque no se permite a las ONG tomar la palabra en la sesión plenaria, los miembros del Comité pueden ser abordados e interpelados durante el descanso de la reunión, al final de la reunión o antes de que empiece el día siguiente. Las ONG no deben dudar en sugerir cuestiones o aclaraciones adicionales que el Comité podría preguntar a los representantes del Estado. Hay además dos ocasiones en las que las ONG pueden encontrarse con miembros del Comité y exponer sus preocupaciones:

Reuniones formales con las ONG

Las ONG tienen la oportunidad de asesorar al Comité en cuestiones y temas de su interés relacionados con países bajo examen durante las reuniones formales con ONG, de una duración típicamente de 30 minutos por país, y que tienen lugar el mismo día o el día antes del examen del informe del Estado. Estas reuniones están presididas por el presidente del Comité y son a puerta cerrada, lo que significa que solamente se permite participar a los miembros del Comité y las ONG. La reunión se desarrolla en los idiomas de trabajo del Comité (inglés, francés y español). Se facilita interpretación entre estos idiomas. El presidente invita a cada ONG a presentar una breve declaración (la declaración no debe ocupar más de 2 ó 3 minutos leída lentamente) y hay reservado un tiempo después para que los miembros del Comité hagan preguntas y las ONG respondan.
Si una ONG nacional no está en disposición de tomar parte en la reunión, el CCPR (http://www.ccprcentre.org/es/) puede dirigirse al Comité de Derechos Humanos en su nombre.

Reuniones informales con las ONG

El Centro por los Derechos Civiles y Políticos organiza también reuniones informales con el Comité. Estas reuniones informales se programan habitualmente a la hora de la comida y pueden durar hasta 90 minutos. No tienen lugar en la sala del Comité y no se proporciona interpretación. Aunque no todos los miembros del Comité asisten a estas reuniones, son una oportunidad única para que las ONG expresen sus inquietudes y respondan a las preguntas de los miembros del Comité. Habitualmente hay una reunión por cada Estado examinado.
El Centro por los Derechos Civiles y Políticos coordina las reuniones informales y ayuda a las ONG en las cuestiones prácticas. Las ONG que deseen participar deben ponerse en contacto con el CCPR antes de la sesión.

6. ¿Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar información?

No

7. ¿Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)?

Debido a la acumulación de trabajo con los informes de los Estados existe un retraso de alrededor de un año entre la presentación del informe del Estado y el inicio de la evaluación por parte del Comité. El Comité se preparará leyendo el informe y cualquier otro material accesible sobre el país en consideración, por ejemplo procedente de Relatores Especiales del Consejo de Derechos Humanos u ONG.
El Comité, con el apoyo del Secretariado, elaborará una Lista de Asuntos y la aprobará durante una de sus sesiones. La Lista de Asuntos se envía al Estado para que pueda preparar respuestas.
Entonces el Estado es examinado en una reunión pública durante una de las sesiones del Comité. El examen empieza con una presentación inicial a cargo de la delegación del Estado que incluye respuestas a la Lista de Asuntos. Los miembros del Comité hacen preguntas a los representantes buscando aclarar o profundizar su comprensión de los asuntos relativos a la implementación y disfrute de los derechos reconocidos en el PIDCP en el Estado. Esto a menudo incluye preguntas que no han sido completamente respondidas en las contestaciones a la Lista de Asuntos.
Habitualmente el Comité necesita dos reuniones de medio día (de tres horas) para evaluar un informe periódico de Estado y tres reuniones (de tres horas) para evaluar un informe inicial. Al final de la sesión, el Comité elaborará Observaciones Finales en las que perfilará las recomendaciones y comentarios sobre la legislación y práctica del Estado.

A) Sensibilización sobre las Observaciones Finales

Una de las área claves para las ONG es atraer el interés nacional para asegurarse de que las Observaciones Finales sean ampliamente difundidas, debatidas e implementadas. Enviar notas de prensa en cuanto estén disponibles las Observaciones Finales es el primer paso para asegurarse de que los medios de comunicación nacionales estén informados sobre las recomendaciones del Comité. Las notas de prensa deben integrar también los descubrimientos y las inquietudes de las ONG.

Las ONG también pueden organizar ruedas de prensa a nivel nacional o aprovechar su presencia en las oficinas de la ONU para reunirse con corresponsales de prensa y agencias con sede en Nueva York o Ginebra.

Aunque el Estado tiene la obligación de traducir las Observaciones Finales a sus idiomas nacionales y ponerlos a disposición del público a menudo esto no se hace. Por ello, una tarea importante de las ONG es asegurarse de que las Observaciones Finales (o las partes importantes) se traducen a los idiomas nacionales y minoritarios y se ponen a disposición de las partes interesadas.

B) Presionar para la implementación de las Observaciones Finales

La implementación de las Observaciones Finales es el objetivo principal de las ONG. Sin embargo, éste es probablemente el aspecto más exigente del proceso de seguimiento, puesto que el resultado depende de la voluntad de las autoridades estatales de cooperar e implicarse activamente en la implementación.
A pesar de ello, las ONG y la sociedad civil pueden desempeñar un papel importante en este asunto, concretamente presionando a las autoridades para asegurarse de que se dan pasos concretos hacia la implementación de las Observaciones Finales. Para hacer participar a las autoridades estatales en el diálogo puede ser muy útil organizar mesas redondas o actividades especiales sobre la puesta en práctica de las Observaciones Finales. Concretamente, se deberían centrar los esfuerzos sobre los parlamentarios y los órganos de los ministerios responsables de poner en práctica y monitorizar los derechos humanos.

C) Volver a informar al Comité de Derechos Humanos

El Comité de Derechos Humanos tiene un procedimiento de seguimiento en el cual pide al Estado que informe sobre la puesta en práctica de las Observaciones Finales seleccionadas un año después del examen. Sin embargo, hasta la fecha el Comité sólo ha incluido una vez la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar entre los asuntos seleccionados para este procedimiento.
En el momento del siguiente examen del Estado, las ONG deben informar del progreso realizado en la implementación de las Observaciones Finales.

8. Historial de la utilización del mecanismo

La mayoría de los asuntos relacionados con la objeción de conciencia aparecerán ante el Comité de Derechos Humanos a diferencia de cualquier otro órgano asociado a tratado.

El Manual de Presentación de Informes de Derechos Humanos de la ONU proporciona asesoramiento a los Estados para plantear la cuestión en su informe al Comité de Derechos Humanos. Según el artículo 18, se les pide a los Estados que hablen de la situación y la posición de los objetores de conciencia y que proporcionen información estadística respecto al número de personas que han solicitado el estatus de objetor de conciencia, y el número de los reconocidos como tales. También se les pide que proporcionen las razones usadas para justificar la objeción de conciencia y los derechos y deberes de los objetores de conciencia en comparación con los que realizan el servicio militar normal.

Datos de contacto: 
La información de la ONG debe enviarse por correo a: Secretary of the Human Rights Committee Human Rights Council and Treaty Bodies Division Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights UNOG-OHCHR, CH-1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland Debe enviarse una copia electrónica a: Secretaría del Comité de Derechos Humanos e-mail: ccpr@ohchr.org. Las ONG tienen que enviar electrónicamente sus documentos a la Secretaría del Comité de Derechos Humanos, así como aportar 25 copias en papel que se distribuirán entre los expertos. Si es necesario, el CCPR ayudará a las ONG en la transmisión de los documentos a la Secretaría.
Lecturas complementarias: 
Observaciones finales
Título Date
Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Yemen 09/08/2005

19. El Comité lamenta que la delegación no haya respondido a la pregunta de si la legislación yemenita reconoce el derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar (art. 18).

El Estado Parte debería velar por que las personas a las que corresponde prestar servicio militar puedan solicitar que se les declare objetores de conciencia y puedan cumplir un servicio alternativo que no tenga carácter punitivo.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: República Árabe Siria 08/08/2005

11. El Comité toma nota de la información facilitada por la delegación de que Siria no reconoce el derecho a la objeción de conciencia respecto del servicio militar pero permite a algunos de quienes no deseen cumplir dicho servicio el pago de cierta suma para eximirse de él (art. 18).

El Estado Parte debe respetar el derecho a la objeción de conciencia con respecto al servicio militar y establecer, si lo desea, un servicio civil alternativo que no tenga carácter punitivo.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Tayiquistán 18/07/2005

20. El Comité expresa preocupación porque el Estado Parte no reconoce el derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar (art. 18).

El Estado Parte debería tomar todas las medidas necesarias para reconocer el derecho de los objetores de conciencia a ser eximidos del servicio militar.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Uzbequistán 26/04/2005

El Estado Parte debería adoptar medidas para garantizar cabalmente el derecho a la libertad de religión o de creencias y velar por que su legislación y procedimientos estén plenamente acordes con el artículo 18 del Pacto.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Grecia 25/04/2005

15. Al Comité le preocupa que la duración del servicio alternativo para los objetores de conciencia sea mucho mayor que la del servicio militar y que la evaluación de las solicitudes de ese servicio esté sometido únicamente al control del Ministerio de Defensa (art. 18).

El Estado Parte debería garantizar que la duración del servicio alternativo al servicio militar no tenga carácter punitivo, y debería estudiar la posibilidad de someter la evaluación de las solicitudes de los objetores de conciencia al control de las autoridades civiles.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Finlandia 02/12/2004

14. El Comité lamenta que el derecho a la objeción de conciencia se reconozca únicamente en tiempo de paz, así como el carácter punitivo de la prolongada duración del servicio civil alternativo respecto a la del servicio militar. También reitera su preocupación por el hecho de que el trato preferencial concedido a los Testigos de Jehová no se haya extendido a los demás grupos de objetores de conciencia.

El Estado Parte debería reconocer plenamente el derecho a la objeción de conciencia y, por lo tanto, garantizarlo tanto en tiempo de guerra como de paz, y debería poner fin al carácter discriminatorio de la duración del servicio civil alternativo y de las categorías de beneficiarios (artículos 18 y 26 del Pacto).

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Polonia 02/12/2004

15. El Comité observa que la duración del servicio alternativo al militar es de 18 meses, en tanto que el servicio militar es de sólo 12 meses (arts. 18 y 26).

El Estado Parte debería garantizar que la duración del servicio alternativo al servicio militar no tenga un carácter punitivo.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Marruecos 01/12/2004

22. El Comité toma nota de las informaciones facilitadas por el Estado Parte en el sentido de que, por una parte, el servicio militar obligatorio reviste carácter subsidiario y sólo interviene en el caso en que el reclutamiento de profesionales sea insuficiente, y, por otra, el Estado Parte no reconoce el derecho a la objeción de conciencia.

El Estado Parte debe reconocer plenamente el derecho a la objeción de conciencia en el supuesto de que el servicio militar sea obligatorio y establecer un servicio alternativo cuyas modalidades no sean discriminatorias (artículos 18 y 26 del Pacto).
http://wri-irg.org/node/7406

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Serbia y Montenegro 12/08/2004

21. El Comité toma nota de la información proporcionada por la delegación según la cual la objeción de conciencia está regida por un decreto provisional que va a ser sustituido por una ley que admitirá la plena objeción de conciencia al servicio militar y un servicio civil alternativo que tendrá la misma duración que el servicio militar (art. 18).

El Estado Parte debería promulgar la citada ley lo antes posible. En ella se debería admitir la objeción de conciencia sin restricciones al servicio militar (art. 18) y un servicio civil alternativo de carácter no punitivo.

Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos: Colombia 26/05/2004

17. El Comité constata con preocupación que la legislación del Estado Parte no permite la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar.

El Estado Parte debería garantizar que los objetores de conciencia puedan optar por un servicio alternativo cuya duración no tenga efectos punitivos (arts. 18 y 26).

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité de Derechos Humanos: Procedimiento de presentación de Comunicaciones

Resumen:

El Primer Protocolo Facultativo establece un mecanismo de denuncias individuales que permite a los individuos presentar denuncias ante el Comité de Derechos Humanos por la violación de uno o varios de sus derechos amparados por el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos. Las comunicaciones sólo pueden presentarse contra un Estado que ha ratificado el Primer Protocolo Facultativo y después de haber agotado mecanismos legales locales. Además, la denuncia no debe haberse enviado a otro órgano ligado a tratado, ni a los mecanismos regionales como la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, la Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos, o el Tribunal Africano de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos.

Si el Comité determina que un Estado Parte no ha cumplido sus obligaciones en relación al PIDCP, exigirá que se repare la violación y pedirá que el Estado Parte aporte información actualizada al respecto. Las decisiones del Comité de Derechos Humanos y sus actividades de seguimiento se hacen públicas y se incluyen su Informe Anual a la Asamblea General.

1. Resultados probables de este mecanismo

Una decisión del Comité de Derechos Humanos sobre el caso, o bien declarando que existe una violación del Pacto por parte del Estado implicado, o bien no admitiendo a trámite el caso. Si se concluye que existe una violación del Pacto, el Comité puede recomendar que el Estado implicado pida disculpas o rectifique la situación. Esto puede incluir una recomendación de compensación al denunciante o su excarcelación.

22. A qué Estados se aplica este mecanismo

Este mecanismo se aplica a los Estados parte del PIDCP que también han firmado y ratificado el Primer Protocolo Facultativo (http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-4&c...).

Se puede presentar denuncia contra un Estado que tenga jurisdicción sobre la víctima en el momento de la violación, y que haya ratificado el Protocolo Facultativo. Como la propia violación puede haber tenido lugar antes de que entrara en vigor el Protocolo Facultativo para el Estado implicado, es importante que algún tribunal nacional tomara una decisión respecto a esta violación después de que entrara en vigor el Protocolo Facultativo.

3. Quién puede presentar información

De acuerdo al Primer Protocolo Facultativo, el Comité puede recibir comunicaciones individuales de cualquier persona bajo la jurisdicción del Estado parte del Primer Protocolo Facultativo que afirme que el Estado parte ha violado sus derechos recogidos en el Pacto.
Si queremos presentar una denuncia en nombre de otra persona o grupo, tenemos que enviar también la conformidad por escrito de cada una de las víctimas que queramos representar o probar que les resulta imposible dar ese consentimiento.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

No existe límite temporal para recibir la información después del supuesto suceso, pero es mejor presentar la comunicación lo antes posible después de haber agotado los recursos legales nacionales. En casos excepcionales, presentar la comunicación después de un periodo prolongado puede provocar que el Comité no admita a trámite nuestro caso.
Según la Regla 96c de los Métodos de Trabajo del Comité, una comunicación enviada después de 5 años desde el agotamiento de los mecanismos nacionales o después de 3 años desde la conclusión de otro procedimiento de investigación o negociación internacional puede constituir un abuso del derecho de presentación.
La presentación al Comité de denuncias reiteradas sobre la misma cuestión que ya hayan sido desestimadas son consideradas un abuso del procedimiento de denuncia.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

Cómo redactar la denuncia:

Los mecanismos de denuncia están diseñados para ser sencillos y accesibles para todo el mundo. No es necesario ser abogado ni tampoco estar familiarizado con el lenguaje técnico legal para presentar una denuncia ante el Comité.

Para que una denuncia sea admisible a trámite tiene que cumplir los siguientes requisitos:

  • Tiene que ser enviada por la persona cuyos derechos han sido violados, o con su consentimiento escrito. Solamente en casos excepcionales, cuando a la persona afectada le sea imposible dar el consentimiento, puede ignorarse este requisito. Las denuncias anónimas no serán admitidas.
  • Es necesario que se hayan agotado los mecanismos nacionales, es decir, que se hayan intentado todos los procedimientos locales de apelación. Sin embargo, si se puede demostrar que los mecanismos locales no son efectivos (por ejemplo, porque el tribunal de mayor rango ya ha dictado sentencia en un caso muy parecido), no son accesibles, o son excesivamente lentos, este requisito puede ser ignorado.
  • Que no esté siendo considerada por otro procedimiento internacional de investigación internacional o de resolución de conflictos.

La denuncia, habitualmente llamada “comunicación” o “petición”, no es necesario que tenga ninguna forma concreta. Sin embargo, tiene que estar por escrito y firmada (lo cual quiere decir que las denuncias por correo electrónico serán desestimadas). Debería aportar información personal básica –nombre, nacionalidad y fecha de nacimiento- y especificar el Estado Parte contra el que va dirigida la denuncia.

La denuncia tiene que incluir todos los hechos sobre los que basa –mejor en orden cronológico, y el trabajo realizado para agotar los mecanismos legales nacionales (incluyendo copias de las sentencias judiciales relevantes y un resumen en uno de los idiomas de trabajo del Comité).

Es útil citar los artículos del tratado que sean aplicables al caso. Debe explicarse en qué sentido los hechos relatados suponen una violación de esos artículos. Puede encontrarse un modelo de formulario de denuncia en http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/docs/annex1.pdf.

Procedimientos de emergencia:

Si existe temor de daño irreparable (por ejemplo en casos de ejecución inminente o deportación para tortura) antes de que el Comité haya examinado el caso, es posible solicitar la intervención del Comité para detener una acción (u omisión) inminente por parte del Estado que podría causar ese daño. Dicha intervención se llama “solicitud de adopción de medidas de protección provisionales”.

6. Qué sucede con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Las dos fases principales de toda denuncia son la fase de “admisión a trámite” y la fase de “fondo”. La “admisión a trámite” de la denuncia se refiere a los requisitos formales que debe cumplir la denuncia antes de que el comité relacionado entre a considerar su contenido. El “fondo” del litigio es el contenido en base al cual el comité decide si los derechos protegidos por un tratado han sido violados o no.

Si la denuncia contiene los elementos básicos definidos arriba será admitida a trámite, es decir, formalmente incluida en la lista de casos en consideración por el Comité. Debido a la gran acumulación de denuncias, pueden pasar al menos dos años desde que la denuncia es admitido hasta que es examinada por el Comité.

Después de la admisión a trámite, la denuncia se transmite al Estado Parte implicado para darle la oportunidad de hacer comentarios. Se le solicita al Estado que responda en un máximo de seis meses. Si el Estado no responde a la denuncia, se le envían recordatorios. Si aún así no hay respuesta, el Comité toma una decisión sobre el caso en base a la denuncia original.

Una vez el Estado responde a uno de los envíos, se le ofrece el denunciante la oportunidad de hacer comentarios. En ese punto, el caso está listo para que el Comité tome una decisión.

El Comité estudia las comunicaciones individuales a puerta cerrada, pero sus Opiniones (decisiones) y el seguimiento son públicos.

7. Historial del uso del mecanismo

El Procedimiento de Presentación de Comunicaciones ha sido usado con éxito en una serie de casos de OC, lo cual ha ayudado a establecer una importante jurisprudencia sobre la duración y condiciones del servicio sustitutorio (Foin v. France, 1999) y sobre el propio derecho a la objeción de conciencia ((Yeo-Bum Yoon y Mr. Myung-Jin Choi v. República de Corea, 2007).).

Datos de contacto: 
Petitions Team OHCHR-UNOG 1211 Geneva 10 Switzerland E-mail: tb-petitions@ohchr.org (indicar “Denuncia de derechos humanos” en el Asunto del correo electrónico.) Fax: +41-22-917 90 22 Se puede llamar solo para orientación sobre el procedimiento: +41-22-917 12 34 (preguntar por el Equipo de Peticiones.)
Lecturas complementarias: 
Views adopted (Jurisprudence)
Título Date
Zafar Abdullayev vs. Turkmenistán 25/03/2015

El Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas ha llegado a la conclusión de que el estado de Turkmenistán ha violado el Artículo 7, el Artículo 10(1), y el Artículo 14(7) debido a que ha sido juzgado y condenado dos veces por su negativa a cumplir el servicio militar, y el Artículo 18(1).

7.2... El Comité observa que a la llegada del autor de la denuncia a la prisión LBK-12 el 3 de abril de 2012 fue objeto de malos tratos por los vigilantes de la cárcel, en violación del artículo 7 del Pacto. Observa que el autor ha aportado una descripción detallada de la forma en que fue maltratado mientras se hallaba en aislamiento, así como la identidad del organizador de sus malos tratos. El autor afirma que fue ubicado en el bloque de aislamiento de la prisión durante 10 días, fue golpeado, obligado a desfilar, hacer flexiones, correr y a sentarse en el suelo con las piernas estiradas. El Comité observa además que las detalladas alegaciones del autor y su argumentación en relación a la ausencia de mecanismos adecuados para la investigación de las denuncias de tortura en Turkmenistán no han sido refutadas por el Estado Parte. El Comité recuerda también que las denuncias de malos tratos deben ser investigadas inmediata e imparcialmente por las autoridades competentes.1 En ausencia de informaciones adicionales pertinentes en el expediente, el Comité decide que ha de concederse la debida credibilidad a las alegaciones del autor. En consecuencia, concluye que los hechos tal y como han sido presentados revelan una violación de los derechos del autor de acuerdo al artículo 7 del Pacto.

7.3... El Comité recuerda que las personas privadas de libertad no pueden ser objeto de otras privaciones o restricciones que las derivadas de la privación de libertad: deben ser tratadas en coherencia con, entre otros, las Reglas Mínimas para el Tratamiento de los Reclusos.2 En ausencia de informaciones adicionales pertinentes en el expediente, el Comité decide que ha de concederse la debida credibilidad a las alegaciones del autor. En consecuencia, concluye que confinar al autor en tales condiciones constituye una violación de su derecho a ser tratado con humanidad y con respeto por la dignidad inherente a la persona humana según el artículo 10 (1) del Pacto.3

7.5... El Comité observa que, en el presente caso, el autor ha sido juzgado y condenado dos veces bajo los mismos supuestos del Código Penal de Turkmenistán en conherencia con el hecho de ser Testigo de Jehová, objetó y se nego a realizar el servicio militar obligatorio. En las circunstancias del caso actual, y en ausencia de información contrario del Estado Parte, el Comité concluye que los derechos del autor según el artículo 14 (7) del Pacto han sido violados.

7.8 En el caso actual, el Comité considera que la negativa del autor a ser reclutado para el servicio militar obligatorio deriva de sus creencias religiosas y que las posteriores condenas y sentencias suponen una vulneración de su libertad de conciencia, en violación del artículo 18 (1) del Pacto. El Comité recuerda que la represión de la negativa al reclutamiento para el servicio militar obligatorio ejercida contra personas cuya conciencia o religión prohíbe el uso de armas es incompatible con el artículo 18 (1) del Pacto.4

9. De acuerdo con el artículo 2 (3) (a) del Pacto, el Estado Parte está obligado a proporcionar al autor una reparación efectiva, que incluya una investigación imparcial, efectiva y detallada de las denuncias del autor en lo tocante al artículo 7, la persecución de cualquier persona hallada responsable, la cancelación de sus antecedentes penales, y una reparación completa, incluyendo una compensación adecuada. El Estado Parte está obligado a evitar similares violaciones del Pacto en el futuro, incluyendo la adopción de medidas legislativas que garanticen el derecho a la objeción de conciencia.

Se puede acceder a las Opiniones completas del Comité aquí.

1. Human Rights Committee, general comment No. 20 (1992) on the prohibition of torture and cruel treatment or punishment.↩

2. Ver por ejemplo la comunicación nº 1520/2006, Mwamba v.Zambia, Opiniones adoptadas el 10 de marzo de 2010, pár. 6.4.↩

3. Ver por ejemplo la comunicación nº 1530/2006, Bozbey v. Turkmenistan, Opiniones adoptadas el 27 de octubre de 2010, pár. 7.3.↩

4. Ver comunicaciones nº 1642-1741, Min-Kyu Jeong et al v. The Republic of Korea (ver nota 14), pár. 7.4; nº 1786/2008, Jong-nam Kim et al. v. Republic of Korea (ver nota 13), pár. 7.5; y nº 2179/2012, Young-kwan Kim et al. v. Republic of Korea, Opiniones adoptadas el 15 de octubre 2014, pár. 7.4.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité de los Derechos del Niño Procedimiento de Presentación de Informes por los Estados

Resumen

El Comité de los Derechos del Niño es un mecanismo basado en tratado que supervisa la puesta en práctica de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño (CRC) (ver http://www2.ohchr.org/spanish/law/crc.htm) y sus Protocolos Facultativos sobre la Venta de Niños (OP1, ver: http://www2.ohchr.org/spanish/law/crc-sale.htm) y sobre la Participación de Niños en Conflictos Armados (OP2, ver: http://www2.ohchr.org/spanish/law/crc-conflict.htm) por los Estados parte (la lista de Estados parte del CRC puede consultarse en:
http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11&..., para el OP1, ver: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-..., para el OP2, ver: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-...). Los informes se examinan mediante un diálogo entre el Comité y representantes del Estado. Durante este diálogo, los miembros del Comité pueden plantear cuestiones acerca de los derechos del niño, incluyendo derechos no tratados en los informes del Estado. Después del diálogo, el Comité emite unas Observaciones Finales que perfilan recomendaciones y comentarios sobre las prácticas y la legislación del Estado.

El Comité solamente tratará cuestiones relacionadas con menores de 18 años. Para los Estados miembros del Protocolo Facultativo sobre la participación de niños en conflictos armados, el Comité trata cuestiones tales como el reclutamiento de menores o una labor de reclutamiento excesiva en las escuelas. Aunque el artículo 14 de la Convención garantiza el derecho de libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, es menos probable que este mecanismo sea directamente relevante en relación con el derecho de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, pero puede ser útil para destacar cuestiones de reclutamiento de menores, reclutamiento irregular, y de presencia del ejército en las escuelas.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Durante el examen del informe del Estado, los miembros del Comité pueden plantear cuestiones relativas al reclutamiento y a la presencia del ejército en las escuelas. Si el Comité llega a la conclusión de que las prácticas del Estado no son compatibles con el CRC, lo destacará en sus Observaciones Finales en forma de inquietudes y recomendaciones. Cuando el Estado vuelve a comparecer ante el Comité, éste muy probablemente preguntará al Estado sobre las mejoras que ha realizado.

Las Observaciones Finales del CRC también formarán parte de la compilación de la OACDH para el Examen Periódico Universal.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable este mecanismo

El mecanismo es aplicable a los Estados que hayan ratificado el CRC. El Protocolo Facultativo sobre Niños en Conflictos Armados sólo es aplicable a los Estados que lo hayan ratificado.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Cualquiera, incluyendo ONG y personas individuales.

4. Cuándo presentar la información


Información para la Lista de Asuntos

Unos 3 ó 4 meses antes de la sesión en la que se examinará el informe del Estado, el grupo de trabajo previo a la sesión programa una reunión privada con las agencias y organismos de la ONU, ONG y otros órganos competentes como organizaciones nacionales de juventud y derechos humanos que han presentado al Comité información adicional. Esta conversación conduce a la Lista de Asuntos que será enviada al Estado, al cual se le pedirá que aporte respuestas por escrito antes de la sesión.

Por ello es importante que se aporte información adicional con buena antelación, y es recomendable presentar un informe al menos 6 de meses antes de la sesión.

Información para la presentación de informes estándar

En su informe, las ONG deben hacer referencia a los informes del Estado (habitualmente existen informes separados para la Convención de los Derechos del Niño y para cada Protocolo Facultativo), y destacar los errores y omisiones en la información aportada por el Estado. Los informes de los Estados son públicos y accesibles en línea en:
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/sessions.htm.

Una vez está disponible el informe del Estado hay que comprobar cuándo es probable que sea estudiado.
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/sessions.htm.

5. Consejos especiales para presentar información a este mecanismo

Estructura del informe

El Grupo de ONG de la Convención de los Derechos del Niño (Grupo de ONG) ha publicado guías detalladas para la presentación de informes al Comité de los Derechos del Niño. Pueden encontrarse en:

Introducción

La introducción debe incluir una presentación de la ONG (incluyendo detalles de contacto) que presenta el informe y datos relevantes sobre el contexto general, como por ejemplo el contexto histórico, situaciones concretas (por ejemplo, el contexto socioeconómico o de conflicto armado), sin repetir la información que se aporta en el informe del Estado.

Parte sustancial

Puede ser recomendable que el informe de la ONG siga la estructura del informe del Estado, en forma de un análisis sección por sección éste. El informe debe comentar o corregir la información aportada por el Estado y explicar la postura de la ONG.

Es importante analizar hasta qué punto la ley, la política y la práctica del Estado cumple o no lo dispuesto en el Protocolo Facultativo. Puesto que los informes de los Estados suelen ser muy legalistas, el informe de la ONG debe proporcionar información sobre la implementación práctica o su ausencia. También debe reflejar las experiencias de niños o menores de 18 años de todo el país, incluyendo diferencias en legislación, administración de servicios, cultura y medio ambiente de las distintas jurisdicciones.

Siempre es buena idea hacer referencia a anteriores Observaciones Finales del Comité y a su puesta en práctica o no.

Conclusiones y recomendaciones

Puede ser buen idea incluir una lista de preguntas que la ONG quiere que el Comité formule al Gobierno. Algunas ONG incluyen una lista de recomendaciones concretas, pero esto es cuestión de enfoque político.

6. Qué sucede con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Después de la presentación del informe periódico o inicial del Estado, que será publicado en el sitio web del Comité de los Derechos del Niño (ver http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/sessions.htm), las ONG tienen la oportunidad de presentar información adicional o sus propios informes. Esto debe hacerse normalmente entre 6 meses y 2 años antes del examen del informe del Estado.

Entre 3 y 4 meses antes del examen del informe del Estado, una reunión del Grupo de Trabajo previo a las sesiones del Comité de los Derechos del Niño elaborará una Lista de Asuntos (ver punto 4). Los Estados pueden elegir aportar respuestas escritas a las cuestiones planteadas en la Lista de Asuntos con antelación al examen del informe.

El examen del informe del Estado tiene lugar en forma de diálogo entre miembros del Comité de los Derechos del Niño y la delegación del Estado en cuestión. Después de la sesión, el Comité redactará sus Observaciones Finales, que también incluyen recomendaciones.

7. Historial del uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado para la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, pero ha sido utilizado con éxito para poner de relieve cuestiones relacionadas con el reclutamiento de menores de 18 años, incluido el reclutamiento agresivo en las escuelas por parte de las Fuerzas Armadas.

Datos de contacto: 
Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Human Rights Treaties Division (HRTD) Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Palais Wilson - 52, rue des Pâquis CH-1201 Geneva (Switzerland) Tel.: +41 22 917 91 41 Fax: +41 22 917 90 08 E-mail: crc@ohchr.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
Observaciones Finales

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité de los Derechos del Niño: Protocolo Facultativo sobre Comunicaciones

Resumen

El Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones del 19 de diciembre de 2011 (ver http://treaties.un.org/doc/source/signature/2012/a-res-66-138-spanish.pdf) establece un mecanismo de denuncias individuales que permite a las personas individuales presentar denuncias al Comité sobre Derechos de los Niños relativas a violaciones de la Convención o de cualquiera de los Protocolos Facultativos de los es parte el Estado. Antes de presentar un denuncia tienen que haberse agotado los recursos legales locales, a menos que estos sean exageradamente largos o ineficaces. La denuncia no debe haberse presentado a ningún otro procedimiento internacional de investigación o resolución de conflictos.

Si el Comité halla que un Estado parte ha incumplido sus obligaciones según la CRC o sus Protocolos Facultativos, exigirá que la violación sea remediada y pedirá al Estado parte que proporcione información de seguimiento a este respecto. Las decisiones del Comité de los Derechos del Niño y sus actividades de seguimiento se hacen públicas y están incluidas en el Informe Anual del Comité a la Asamblea General.

En el momento de redactar esta guía (agosto de 2012), el Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de comunicaciones todavía no había entrado en vigor, ni había sido ratificado aun por más de 10 Estados. Puede consultarse el estado de las ratificaciones en http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-...

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

El Comité sobre los Derechos del Niño decide si el caso no se admite a trámite o publica sus opiniones sobre el caso si halla alguna violación de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño o uno de sus Protocolos Facultativos. Si halla alguna violación, el Comité puede recomendar que el Estado en cuestión haga modificaciones o rectifique la situación.

El Comité también puede intentar llegar a un acuerdo amistoso entre el Estado parte y la víctima o víctimas.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

Este mecanismo se aplica a los Estados partes de la CRC que también hayan firmado el Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones. Puede comprobarse el estado de las ratificaciones en http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-.... Se pueden presentar denuncias contra cualquier Estado que tenía jurisdicción sobre la víctima en el momento de la violación, y al mismo tiempo haya ratificado el Protocolo Facultativo.

3. Quién puede presentar la información

Según el Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones el Comité puede recibir Comunicaciones individuales (denuncias) de cualquier persona individual bajo la jurisdicción de un Estado parte del Protocolo Facultativo que declare que sus derechos protegidos por la Convención han sido violados por el Estado parte.

Si queremos presentar una denuncia en nombre de otra persona o grupo, tendremos que presentar por escrito una prueba del consentimiento de cada víctima que queramos representar, o pruebas de por qué no tienen la capacidad de dar dicho consentimiento.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

De acuerdo al Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones, las denuncias tienen que presentarse dentro de un plazo de un año desde el agotamiento de los recursos legales nacionales, menos en los casos en que pueda demostrarse que no ha sido posible hacerlo.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

En el momento de redactar esta Guía, el Comité todavía no había aprobado el reglamento para presentar las denuncias (comunicaciones) de acuerdo al Protocolo Facultativo de la Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño relativo a un procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones. Para actualizar esta información, visitar el sitio web del Comité en http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/sessions.htm.

Por ello, lo que viene a continuación está adaptado de las directrices para presentar información al Comité de Derechos Humanos.

Cómo redactar una denuncia:

Los mecanismos de denuncia están diseñados para ser sencillos y accesibles para todo el mundo. No es necesario ser abogado ni tampoco estar familiarizado con el lenguaje técnico legal para presentar una denuncia ante el Comité.

Para que una denuncia sea admisible a trámite tiene que cumplir los siguientes requisitos:

  • Tiene que ser enviada por la persona cuyos derechos han sido violados, o con su consentimiento escrito. Solamente en casos excepcionales, cuando a la persona afectada le sea imposible dar el consentimiento, puede ignorarse este requisito. Las denuncias anónimas no serán admitidas.
  • Es necesario que se hayan agotado los mecanismos nacionales, es decir, que se hayan intentado todos los procedimientos locales de apelación. Sin embargo, si se puede demostrar que los mecanismos locales no son eficaces (por ejemplo, porque el tribunal de mayor rango ya ha dictado sentencia en un caso muy parecido), no son accesibles, o son excesivamente lentos, este requisito puede ser ignorado.
  • Que no esté siendo considerada por otro procedimiento internacional de investigación internacional o de resolución de conflictos.

La denuncia, habitualmente llamada “comunicación” o “petición”, no es necesario que tenga ninguna forma concreta. Sin embargo, tiene que estar por escrito y firmada (lo cual quiere decir que las denuncias por correo electrónico serán desestimadas). Debería aportar información personal básica –nombre, nacionalidad y fecha de nacimiento- y especificar el Estado Parte contra el que va dirigida la denuncia.

La denuncia tiene que incluir todos los hechos sobre los que basa –mejor en orden cronológico, y el trabajo realizado para agotar los mecanismos legales nacionales (incluyendo copias de las sentencias judiciales relevantes y un resumen en uno de los idiomas de trabajo del Comité).

Es útil citar los artículos del Protocolo Facultativo que sean aplicables al caso. Debe explicarse en qué sentido los hechos relatados suponen una violación de esos artículos.

Procedimientos de emergencia:

Si existe temor de daño irreparable (por ejemplo en casos de ejecución inminente o deportación para tortura) antes de que el Comité haya examinado el caso, es posible solicitar la intervención del Comité para detener una acción (u omisión) inminente por parte del Estado que podría causar ese daño.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Puesto que el Protocolo Facultativo no había entrado en vigor en el momento de escribir estas líneas, actualmente no existen experiencias previa de denuncias presentadas ante el Comité de los Derechos del Niño.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Puesto que el Protocolo Facultativo no había entrado en vigor en el momento de escribir estas líneas, no ha podido ser usado aún.

Datos de contacto: 
Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Human Rights Treaties Division (HRTD) Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Palais Wilson - 52, rue des Pâquis CH-1201 Geneva (Switzerland) Tel.: +41 22 917 91 41 Fax: +41 22 917 90 08 E-mail: crc@ohchr.org
Opiniones (Jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Other Treaty Bodies

Apart from the Human Rights Committee, the other treaty bodies, which include the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination (CERD) and the Committee Against Torture (CAT) are not likely to be the first port of call for a conscientious objector. The more obvious mechanisms for conscientious objectors to military service are the Human Rights Committee and the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council, such as thematic and country-specific rapporteurs.

Like the Human Rights Committee, each treaty body oversees the implementation of a convention. The outcomes from these treaty bodies are similar to those of the Human Rights Committee. Both CERD and CAT have an optional individual communications procedure, enabling the committees to consider individual cases as well as State practice and legislation. However, these procedures are very underused.

When you might use other treaty bodies

If you find that the State who is failing to recognise rights associated with conscientious objection is not a party to the ICCPR but is a party to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD), International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) or the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT), you may wish to pursue your case or country situation under these conventions. All treaty bodies receive periodic reports from states party to the treaty. Rules of procedure are similar to those for the Human Rights Committee. You should read the relevant conventions in full to see if the State Party is failing to respect these rights. These are available on the web at http://www.ohchr.org.

Sources

http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/ccpr-one.htm
http://treaties.un.org/Pages/Treaties.aspx?id=4&subid=A&lang=en

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas (CDH)

Resumen

En 2006, el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU reemplazó a la Comisión de Derechos Humanos de la ONU. El Consejo es un organismo intergubernamental dentro del sistema de derechos humanos de la ONU formado por 47 Estados elegidos por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas y responsables de potenciar la promoción y protección de los derechos humanos en todo el mundo. Su objetivo principal es abordar situaciones de violación de los derechos humanos y hacer recomendaciones al respecto. Su mandato fue establecido por la resolución de la Asamblea General 60/251 del 15 de marzo de 2006.

El Consejo se reúne en sesión ordinaria tres veces al año y en sesión especial según las necesidades, y depende de la Asamblea General.

IEn 2007, el Consejo adoptó su “plan de construcción institucional” que establecía un sistema de cuatro mecanismos subsidiarios, de los cuales los dos siguientes son los más importantes para las ONG y las personas individuales que trabajan en objeción de conciencia al servicio militar:

La lista de los Estados miembros puede encontrarse en esta dirección: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/Pages/Membership.aspx

El 5 de julio de 2012, durante su XX sesión, el Consejo de Derechos Humanos aprobó una resolución sobre la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, ““recordando todas las anteriores resoluciones y decisiones relevantes, incluyendo la decisión del Consejo de Derechos Humanos 2/102 del 6 de octubre de 2006, y las resoluciones de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos 2004/35 del 19 de abril de 2004 y 1998/77, del 22 de abril de 1998, en la cual la Comisión reconocía el derecho de toda persona a hacer objeción de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, como se expone en el artículo 18 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, y en el artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos y la Observación General nº 22 (1993) del Comité de Derechos Humanos.””.

Interpretations

Título Date
Conscientious objection to military service (Resolution 2013/24) 23/09/2013

The resolution recalls the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and previous Human Rights Council and Commission resolutions on the subject of conscientious objection to military service, and:

  • Encourages all States, relevant United Nations agencies, programmes and funds, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and national human rights institutions to cooperate fully with the Office of the High Commissioner by providing relevant information for the preparation of the next quadrennial analytical report on conscientious objection to military service, in particular on new developments, best practices and remaining challenges";
  • "Welcomes the fact that some States accept claims of conscientious objection to military service as valid without inquiry;";
  • "encourages States to allow applications for conscientious objection prior to, during and after military service, including reserve duties";
  • "Emphasizes that States should take the necessary measures to refrain from subjecting individuals to imprisonment solely on the basis of their conscientious objection to military service and to repeated punishment for refusing to perform military service, and recalls that repeated punishment of conscientious objectors for refusing a renewed order to serve in the military may amount to punishment in breach of the legal principle ne bis in idem";
  • "Also encourages States, as part of post-conflict peacebuilding, to consider granting and effectively implementing, amnesties and restitution of rights, in law and in practice, for those who have refused to undertake military service on grounds of conscientious objection to military service";
  • "Invites States to consider including in their national reports, to be submitted to the universal periodic review mechanism and to United Nations human rights treaty bodies, information on domestic provisions related to the right to conscientious objection"
Jurisprudencia

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Examen Periódico Universal (EPU)

Resumen

El Examen Periódico Universal (UPR) se estableció junto con el Consejo de Derechos Humanos mediante la resolución 60/251 en 2006 y es un mecanismo único en el sistema de derechos humanos de las Naciones Unidas que implica un examen de los registros de derechos humanos de todos los Estados miembros de la ONU cada 4 años y medio basado en la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos, y cualquier otro instrumento de derechos humanos del que forme parte el Estado objeto de revisión, así como las promesas y compromisos voluntarios asumidos por el Estado. Durante el proceso del examen, otros Estados examinan las prácticas de derechos humanos de un Estado basándose en información aportada por éste, una recopilación de documentos relevantes de las Naciones Unidas preparada por la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de Derechos Humanos (OACDH) e información aportada por otras partes interesadas, incluidas ONG (recopilada por la OACDH).

Otros Estados pueden hacer preguntas y recomendaciones que el Estado a examen puede aceptar o rechazar. El resultado de este examen se refleja en un “informe final” que enumera las recomendaciones que se hacen al Estado examinado. Hasta el siguiente examen previsto, el Estado a revisión tiene 4 años para implementar las recomendaciones aceptadas y cumplir sus compromisos voluntarias.

El segundo ciclo del Examen Periódico Universal empezó en la XIII sesión del Consejo de Derechos Humanos en mayo de 2012, y se prolongará hasta noviembre de 2016.
Más información, incluyendo un calendario del ciclo de examen actual, puede encontrarse en la siguiente página: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/UPRMain.aspx

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Puesto que se trata de un procedimiento intergubernamental, solamente los Estados pueden hacer preguntas o hacer recomendaciones al Estado a revisión. Las ONG no pueden intervenir directamente, sino que tiene que conseguir que un Estado haga esas preguntas o recomendaciones. El Estado a examen puede entonces aceptar o rechazar una recomendación.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

Este mecanismo es aplicable a todos los Estados miembros de las Naciones Unidas.

3. Quién puede presentar información

El examen en el Grupo de Trabajo se basa en tres fuentes de información:

  • Información preparada por el Estado a examen sobre la situación de los derechos humanos en su territorio. Esto puede tener la forma de un informe nacional de no más de 20 páginas de extensión.
  • Un recopilación de “la información contenida en los informes de los órganos de tratados, los procedimientos especiales, incluidas las observaciones y comentarios del Estado examinado, y otros documentos oficiales pertinentes de las Naciones Unidas, que no excederá de diez páginas” (Resolución A/HRC/RES/5/1). Puede incluir por ejemplo Observaciones Finales del Comité de Derechos Humanos o del Comité de los Derechos del Niño, informes de Relatores Especiales o Equipos de País de las Naciones Unidas, etc. Esta recopilación es preparada por la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de Derechos Humanos (OACDH).
  • Otra “información creíble y de confianza” proporcionada por “otras partes interesadas relevantes” (incluidas ONG), resumida por la Oficina del Alto Comisionado en un documento que no excederá las diez páginas de extensión (Resolución A/HRC/RES/5/1).

Estos tres documentos habitualmente están disponibles en el sitio web de la OACDH diez semanas antes del comienzo del Grupo de Trabajo del EPU.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

El Grupo de Trabajo del Examen Periódico Universal celebra tres sesiones al año dedicada cada una de ellas a 14 Estados, hasta que son examinados todos los Estados miembros de la ONU.


Según la resolución A/HRC/RES/5/1, ““Se alienta a los Estados a que preparen la información mediante un amplio proceso de consulta a nivel nacional con todos los actores interesados pertinentes”.”. Si nuestro Estado está siguiendo este procedimiento, puede ser buena idea implicarse en el proceso y hacer presión para que se incluya el tema de la objeción de conciencia en el informe del Estado. A menudo, coaliciones de ONG nacionales unen fuerzas para presentar un informe conjunto. Si es así, puede ser recomendable participar en esa coalición para asegurarse de que el tema de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar es incluido en un informe amplio de las ONG. Este proceso de consulta nacional es probable que tenga lugar un año antes del informe más o menos.

De 6 a 8 meses antes del informe:: el plazo para la presentación de la información a la OACDH por parte de las ONG es de entre 6 y 8 meses antes de la sesión. La información debe presentarse y recibirse en la medianoche (hora de Ginebra) del día del plazo estipulado, y las presentaciones posteriores no serán tenidas en cuenta.

Unas 6 semanas antes de la sesión de cada Grupo de Trabajo, la ONG UPR-Info celebra reuniones abiertas para que las ONG sugieran preguntas y recomendaciones. Todas las delegaciones gubernamentales están invitadas a estas reuniones, y la programación debe dejar tiempo suficiente para que las delegaciones consulten a sus respectivos gobiernos. Las ONG interesadas en participar pueden contactar en la siguiente dirección:
UPR Info
Avenue du Mail 14
1205 Geneva, Switzerland
Tlf.: + 41 22 321 77 70
Fax: + 41 22 321 77 71
Email: info@upr-info.org

Como el examen es un procedimiento intergubernamental es importante hacer presión a otros gobiernos para plantear preguntas y hacer recomendaciones al Estado a examen, ya sea a través de las embajadas de otros Estados en nuestro país o mediante las misiones permanentes de la ONU en Ginebra. Para plantear cuestiones específicas relativas a la objeción de conciencia es muy recomendable ponerse en contacto con UPR Info.

Durante el examen: el examen tiene lugar en un Grupo de Trabajo del Consejo de Derechos Humanos, compuesto por todos los Estados miembros de la ONU y presidido por el presidente del Consejo. Las ONG con estatus consultivo pueden asistir pero no tomar la palabra durante el examen.
El informe es preparado por una troika seleccionada por sorteo entre los miembros del Consejo de Derechos Humanos y de diversos grupos regionales. La troika recibe las preguntas y asuntos escritos planteados por los Estados y las redirige al Estado a examen. Durante el examen, los miembros de la troika no tienen ningún papel específico.
Después del examen, la troika se encarga de preparar un informe del Grupo de Trabajo con la participación del Estado a examen y la ayuda de la OACDH. Uno de los miembros de la troika presentará el informe antes de su aprobación por el Grupo de Trabajo.

3-4 meses después del examen: El informe del Grupo de Trabajo se aprueba por consenso en una sesión plenaria del Consejo de Derechos Humanos. Durante este sesión, las ONG disponen de un total de 20 minutos para declaraciones orales tras las presentaciones del Estado a examen y de otros Estados (20 minutos cada uno), y antes de que se apruebe el informe final. Sólo las ONG con estatus consultivo pueden hacer declaraciones orales. También es posible presentar una declaración por escrito ya que no todas las ONG pueden ser tenidas en consideración y se favorecen generalmente las coaliciones de ONG. Estas declaraciones escritas se convertirán en documentos oficiales de la ONU pero sin embargo tendrán menos impacto que una declaración verbal. Hay un plazo de habitualmente dos semanas antes del comienzo de la sesión para las declaraciones escritas, y existen instrucciones técnicas muy detalladas para la presentación de declaraciones, las cuales deben ser enviadas por correo electrónico.

Para acceder a la retransmisión por internet de los diálogos interactivos podemos visitar: http://www.un.org/webcast/unhrc/archive.asp?go=080507.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para hacer la presentación

Como se dice en el punto 3, la OACDH pide a las ONG que limiten sus presentaciones oficiales a un documento de 5 páginas (2815 palabras), al cual pueden adjuntarse otras informaciones. Cuando la información es presentada por una gran coalición de ONG, la presentación oficial puede llegar a las 10 páginas (5630 palabras). Para facilitar la referencia, los párrafos y las páginas deben estar numerados. Las ONG tienen que presentar su informe en formato de documento de Microsoft Word por correo electrónico y no en cualquier otro formato (no en PDF), ni en papel.

El segundo y los posteriores ciclos del EPU se centrarán en las recomendaciones aceptadas en los ciclos de examen previos por el Estado examinado, y también en la evolución de la situación de los derechos humanos en el Estado desde el último examen, aunque también podrá plantearse cualquier otro tema que entre en el ámbito de aplicación del Examen Periódico Universal.

La OACDH ha publicado unas “directrices técnicas” para las Instituciones Nacionales de Derechos Humanos y ONG que deben seguir al presentar información al Examen Periódico Universal. Las directrices para el segundo ciclo (2012-2016) pueden consultarse en: http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/AboutUs/CivilSociety/Universal_Periodic_R...

Las presentaciones deben hacerse en la dirección uprsubmissions@ohchr.org. Solamente debe presentarse un documento relativo a un solo país por cada mensaje de correo electrónico, e incluir el nombre de la ONG o coalición, el país, y la fecha de la sesión en la línea del asunto del mensaje.

Para solicitar ayuda o plantear preguntas relacionadas con el Examen Periódico Universal, el sitio web de UPR-Info ofrece una enorme cantidad de recomendaciones e información: http://upr-info.org.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Si la presentación cumple las directrices técnicas, será publicada en el sitio web de la OACDH diez semanas antes de que empiece la labor del Grupo de Trabajo del Examen Periódico Universal. Cabe esperar que la información contenida en la presentación sea también incluida en la recopilación de información aportada por “otros actores relevantes” que hace la OACDH.

Seguimiento

Tras el examen, es importante hacer el seguimiento de las recomendaciones aceptadas por el Estado y vigilar su implantación.

Se alienta a los Estados a enviar un informe a medio plazo sobre la ejecución de las recomendaciones del Examen Periódico Universal al Consejo de Derechos Humanos. Esto nos da una oportunidad adicional para hacer presión, y las ONG con estatus consultivo también pueden presentar comentarios en forma de declaración escrita al Consejo de Derechos Humanos.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

La cuestión de la objeción de conciencia ha sido planteada varias veces durante el primer ciclo del Examen Periódico Universal, por ejemplo, durante el examen de Colombia en 2009. Resolución A/HRC/10/82: http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G09/102/06/PDF/G0910206.pdf?O...

LA OACDH ha desarrollado una base de datos especial para la documentación relativa al Examen Periódico Universal que puede encontrarse en la siguiente dirección: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/Documentation.aspx

Datos de contacto: 
Dirección de la OACDH: Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Email: uprsubmissions@ohchr.org http://www.ohchr.org/EN/AboutUs/Pages/ContactUs.aspx
Lecturas complementarias: 

Interpretations

Título Date
Conscientious objection to military service (Resolution 2013/24) 23/09/2013

The resolution recalls the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and previous Human Rights Council and Commission resolutions on the subject of conscientious objection to military service, and:

  • Encourages all States, relevant United Nations agencies, programmes and funds, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and national human rights institutions to cooperate fully with the Office of the High Commissioner by providing relevant information for the preparation of the next quadrennial analytical report on conscientious objection to military service, in particular on new developments, best practices and remaining challenges";
  • "Welcomes the fact that some States accept claims of conscientious objection to military service as valid without inquiry;";
  • "encourages States to allow applications for conscientious objection prior to, during and after military service, including reserve duties";
  • "Emphasizes that States should take the necessary measures to refrain from subjecting individuals to imprisonment solely on the basis of their conscientious objection to military service and to repeated punishment for refusing to perform military service, and recalls that repeated punishment of conscientious objectors for refusing a renewed order to serve in the military may amount to punishment in breach of the legal principle ne bis in idem";
  • "Also encourages States, as part of post-conflict peacebuilding, to consider granting and effectively implementing, amnesties and restitution of rights, in law and in practice, for those who have refused to undertake military service on grounds of conscientious objection to military service";
  • "Invites States to consider including in their national reports, to be submitted to the universal periodic review mechanism and to United Nations human rights treaty bodies, information on domestic provisions related to the right to conscientious objection"
Recomendaciones y compromisos
Título Date
Informe del Grupo de Trabajo del Examen Periódico Universal: República de Corea 25/08/2008

En el Grupo de Trabajo “Eslovenia observó que el Comité de Derechos Humanos había recomendado a la República de Corea que reconociera el derecho de los objetores de conciencia a ser eximidos del servicio militar. El Comité había constatado la violación del párrafo 1 del artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos en relación con dos de las comunicaciones recibidas. Eslovenia recomendó a la República de Corea que proporcionar a un recurso efectivo a los autores de las comunicaciones, como le había indicado el Comité. Le recomendó además que reconociera jurídicamente el derecho de objeción de conciencia, despenalizara la negativa a cumplir el servicio militar y eliminara todas las disposiciones vigentes que prohibieran a los objetores acceder a empleos en el sector público.” El Reino Unido recomendó “que se adopten medidas activas para ofrecer a los objetores de conciencia opciones distintas del servicio militar.

La República de Corea no aceptó explícitamente estas recomendaciones, pero informó que había “un nuevo programa para ofrecer a los objetores de conciencia la posibilidad de prestar el servicio civil alternativo. Para aplicar el nuevo sistema, el Gobierno tenía que revisar la Ley del servicio militar, y durante el año en curso presentaría probablemente a la Asamblea Nacional una versión revisada de esa ley”, the statement continued, “the Government has to revise the Military Service Act, and considers submitting a revised Act to the National Assembly this year.” (http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session2/KR/A_HRC_8_40_RoK_S...)

En sus respuestas escritas en el momento de la aprobación del informe, la República de Corea declaró únicamente respecto a ambas recomendaciones que “estaban siendo estudiados programas de servicio alternativo para los objetores de conciencia.

(http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session2/KR/A_HRC_8_40_Add1_...)

Informe del Grupo de Trabajo del Examen Periódico Universal: Finlandia 23/05/2008

En el Grupo de Trabajo, el Reino Unido “se felicitaba de los intentos por poner fin a la discriminación contra los objetores de conciencia mediante la reforma de la Ley del servicio no militar. No obstante, el Reino Unido alentó a Finlandia a reducir aún más la duración del servicio no militar y establecer la paridad entre la duración del servicio no militar y la duración media, en lugar de la duración más larga posible, del servicio militar.

Aunque el tema no fue incluido entre las respuestas formales a las recomendaciones, la delegación finlandesa respondió a los comentarios del Reino Unido durante el diálogo del Grupo de Trabajo, declarando que “Respecto de la importante cuestión de la duración del servicio no militar finlandés, que se había reducido recientemente, y era ahora, con arreglo a la Ley de los servicios militares, igual a la duración máximos del servicio militar, la representante de Finlandia citó al Comité constitucional del Parlamento finlandés que había comparado la carga de los servicios no militar y militar, y había determinado que la carga global, independientemente de la duración, era más o menos igual en las dos formas de servicios, determinación en que se había basado la decisión sobre la duración del servicio no militar.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Procedimientos Especiales del Consejo de Derechos Humanos

Resumen

“Procedimientos especiales” es el nombre que reciben los mecanismos del Consejo de Derechos Humanos para inspeccionar las violaciones de los derechos humanos en países concretos o examinar temas globales de derechos humanos. Básicamente hay dos mandatos diferentes:

Las funciones principales de los Procedimientos Especiales son:

  • analizar la cuestión temática o situación del país relevante, incluyendo realizar visitas a países;
  • recomendar las medidas que deberían tomarse por los gobiernos o actores implicados;
  • alertar a las agencias de la ONU, y en particular al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, y al público sobre la necesidad de tomar cartas en determinadas situaciones o asuntos;
  • actuar en defensa de las víctimas de violaciones de los derechos humanos por medio de medidas como la acción urgente, e instar a los Estados a que respondan a denuncias concretas y proporcionen reparación;
  • activar y movilizar a las comunidades nacionales e internacionales y al Consejo de Derechos Humanos para que aborden determinadas cuestiones de los derechos humanos, y estimular la cooperación entre gobiernos, sociedad civil y organizaciones intergubernamentales;
  • hacer seguimiento de las recomendaciones

En casos individuales, pueden enviar las llamadas comunicaciones (llamamientos urgentes y cartas de denuncia) sobre supuestas violaciones de los derechos humanos al gobierno implicado.

Presentan sus informes anuales y también informes sobre las visitas a países, estudios temáticos al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, y documentos seleccionados a la Asamblea General. Todos los procedimientos especiales producen conjuntamente un informe de comunicaciones para cada sesión del Consejo de Derechos Humanos, que incluye cartas de denuncia y llamamientos urgentes, y respuestas recibidas de gobiernos.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

En casos individuales, la persona titular del mandato puede enviar o bien un llamamiento urgente o bien una carta de denuncia (de violaciones de los derechos humanos) al gobierno del Estado implicado. Según la respuesta recibida del gobierno, la persona titular del mandato decidirá qué pasos tomar a continuación.
Por regla general, la existencia y contenido tanto de los llamamientos urgentes como de las cartas de denuncia son confidenciales hasta que se incluye un resumen de esas comunicaciones y las respuestas recibidas del Estado en cuestión en el informe conjunto de comunicaciones de todos los Procedimientos Especiales del Consejo de Derechos Humanos. El informe conjunto de comunicaciones también incluye enlaces hacia el llamamiento urgente o la carta de denuncia originales, y -si está disponible- hacia la respuesta del gobierno.
Los Procedimientos Especiales pueden usarse para denuncias sobre la legislación y prácticas del Estado. La persona titular del mandato puede plantear estas cuestiones cómo y cuándo piense que es adecuado.

Las personas titulares de mandatos de Procedimientos Especiales llevan a cabo visitas a los países, durante las cuales se reúnen con representantes del Estado, pero también con ONG. Los Procedimientos Especiales sólo pueden visitar países que hayan accedido a su solicitud de invitación. Algunos países han publicado “invitaciones permanentes", lo que significa que están, en principio, preparados para recibir la visita de cualquier persona titular de un mandato de Procedimientos Especiales. Hasta finales de diciembre de 2011, 90 Estados han cursado invitaciones permanentes a los Procedimientos Especiales. Después de sus visitas, las personas titulares de mandatos de procedimientos especiales elaboran un informe de la misión, que contiene sus descubrimientos y recomendaciones.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

Todos.

3. Quién puede presentar información?

Todo el mundo.

4. Cuándo debe presentarse la información?

La información sobre casos individuales debe presentarse tan pronto como sea posible, sobre todo en casos en que se desea una acción urgente por parte del Procedimiento Especial.

Para cuestiones relacionadas con la legislación y prácticas del Estado, la información se puede presentar en cualquier momento. Es también recomendable no perder de vista las visitas del Procedimiento Especial relevante a nuestro país, y presentar la información oportunamente antes de la visita programada, e intentar programar una reunión durante la visita. Una coalición de ONG puede tener mayores probabilidades de conseguir una reunión durante una visita al país que ONG individuales desconocidas hasta el momento para el Procedimiento Especial.

5. Reglamentos especiales

La información puede presentarse por correo postal o electrónico, pero los envíos anónimos serán descartados. En los casos individuales, las presentaciones a los Procedimientos Especiales no son procesos cuasi judiciales, es decir, no tienen el objetivo de sustituir los procedimientos legales nacionales o internacionales. Por tanto, no es necesario que se hayan agotado los recursos internos.

Las denuncias de violaciones de los derechos humanos deben contener detalles claros y concisos sobre el caso, el nombre y otras informaciones identificativas de las víctimas individuales, información sobre las circunstancias, incluyendo -si está disponible- la fecha y el lugar de los incidentes, los supuestos autores, los supuestos motivos, y todos los pasos ya tomados a nivel, nacional, regional o internacional al respecto del caso.

6. Qué le sucede a la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Las personas titulares de mandatos de los Procedimientos Especiales pueden acusar recibo del envío de información de personas individuales y organizaciones, pero a menudo no lo hacen. Tampoco se les exige que informen a quienes aportan información de las medidas posteriores que han tomado, y a menudo no lo hacen.

En caso de petición de acción urgente, la Oficina Central de Respuesta Rápida de la División de Procedimientos Especiales de la OACDH coordina el envío de comunicaciones por parte de todos los mandatos. Se pide a los gobiernos que proporcionen una respuesta sustancial a los llamamientos urgentes en un plazo de 30 días. Sólo en los casos adecuados la persona titular del mandato podría decidir hacer público el llamamiento urgente emitiendo una nota de prensa.

Normalmente, se pide a los gobiernos que contesten a las cartas de denuncia de violaciones de los derechos humanos en un plazo de dos meses.

En el informe conjunto de comunicaciones de los Procedimientos Especiales al Consejo de Derechos Humanos se puede encontrar normalmente un resumen de los llamamientos urgentes y las cartas de denuncias, así como las respuestas de los gobiernos. Esto incluye los nombres de las víctimas, a menos que haya razones concretas para que sigan siendo confidenciales. Es este caso, debemos explicar esas razones en nuestra presentación inicial.

Los informes de comunicaciones conjuntas pueden encontrarse en la siguiente dirección: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/SP/Pages/CommunicationsreportsSP.aspx.

Datos de contacto: 
Cómo presentar información sobre supuestas violaciones de los derechos humanos a los Procedimientos Especiales Special Procedures Division c/o OHCHR-UNOG 8-14 Avenue de la Paix 1211 Geneva 10 Switzerland Fax: +41-22-917 90 06 Para acciones urgentes: E-mail: urgent-action@ohchr.org http://www2.ohchr.org/spanish/bodies/chr/special/index.htm Para información complementaria, o para presentar información (diferente de la información concreta sobre supuestas violaciones de los derechos humanos) podemos entrar en contacto en esta dirección: spdinfo@ohchr.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
Informes

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o Creencias

Resumen

El Relator Espacial sobre Libertad de Religión o Creencias es un experto independiente nombrado por el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU. Anteriormente se llamaba Relator Especial sobre Intolerancia Religiosa y fue creado originalmente por la Comisión de Derechos Humanos de la ONU.
El mandato está basado primariamente en el artículo 18 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, el artículo 18 del PIDCP y la Declaración sobre la eliminación de todas las formas de intolerancia y discriminación fundadas en la religión o las creencias.

La persona titular del mandato tiene la misión de identificar y examinar incidentes y acciones gubernamentales en cualquier lugar del mundo que sean incompatibles con el disfrute del derecho a la libertad de religión o creencias. El Relator Especial recomienda medidas correctoras según proceda, lo cual incluye hacer llegar llamamientos urgentes (para intentar prevenir violaciones de los derechos humanos) y cartas de denuncia (de hechos que han sucedido) a los Estados. Además, la persona titular del mandato realiza visitas a los países con el objetivo de hallar evidencias y presenta informes al Consejo de Derechos Humanos y la Asamblea General, así como informes anuales, poniendo de relieve las prácticas de los Estados, tendencias y casos individuales, y estudios temáticos.

Como la objeción de conciencia como derecho humano encaja en el derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, religión o creencias, el Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o Creencias tiene el mandato más estrechamente relacionado con la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar y aborda con gran frecuencia cuestiones de objeción de conciencia. Los casos de objeción de conciencia no religiosa pueden ser, sin embargo, un poco más difíciles, aunque en teoría están incluidos en el mandato.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

a) Casos individuales

Cuando el Relator Especial ha recibido la información sobre casos de supuestas violaciones de los derechos humanos, la persona titular del mandato puede o bien enviar un llamamiento urgente o una carta de denuncia al gobierno del Estado implicado. Dependiendo de la respuesta obtenida del gobierno, el Relator Especial decidirá sobre los siguientes pasos a dar.
Por regla general, la existencia y contenido tanto de los llamamientos urgentes como de las cartas de denuncia son confidenciales hasta que se incluye un resumen de esas comunicaciones y las respuestas recibidas del Estado implicado en el informe conjunto de comunicaciones de todos los Procedimientos Especiales del Consejo de Derechos Humanos. El informe conjunto de comunicaciones también incluye enlaces hacia el llamamiento urgente o la carta de denuncia originales, y -si está disponible- hacia la respuesta del gobierno.

b) Legislación y prácticas estatales

El Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o Creencias también recibe información sobre legislación y prácticas de los Estados, y plantea cuestiones relacionadas con el Estado implicado, o bien mediante comunicaciones, o durante una visita al Estado. El Relator Especial puede hacer recomendaciones en el Informe Anual, o en un informe sobre una visita. Por ejemplo, en el informe provisional a la Asamblea General de la ONU de julio de 2009, la Relatora Especial hizo notar que “objeción de conciencia al servicio militar es una cuestión que suscita preocupación en algunos Estados. La Relatora Especial celebra el hecho de que cada vez más Estados hayan aprobado legislación que exime del servicio militar a los ciudadanos que profesan genuinamente creencias religiosas o de otro tipo que les prohíben realizar el servicio militar, y hayan sustituido el servicio militar obligatorio por un servicio nacional alternativo. No obstante, la legislación de algunos países sigue planteando problemas en lo tocante a los requisitos y condiciones necesarios para acogerse a la objeción de conciencia. La Relatora recomienda un examen exhaustivo de esas leyes desde la perspectiva del cumplimiento de las normas y mejores prácticas internacionales.” (ver http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N09/408/72/PDF/N0940872.pdf?O...)

A continuación de una visita a Azerbaiyán, la Relatora Especial urgió “al gobierno a cumplir los compromisos enunciados ante el Consejo de Europa y a aprobar legislación sobre el servicio alternativo, en virtud de lo dispuesto en su propia Constitución, que otorga tal derecho.” (ver http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G06/147/17/PDF/G0614717.pdf?O...)

Tras una visita a Turkmenistán, la Relatora Especial recomendó: “El gobierno debería garantizar que se les ofrezca a los objetores de conciencia en Turkmenistán, en particular a los Testigos de Jehová que se niegan a servir en el ejército debido a sus creencias religiosas, un servicio civil alternativo que sea compatible con las motivos de la objeción de conciencia. Así, el gobierno debería también revisar la Ley de Conscripción y Servicio Militar, que hace referencia a la posibilidad de ser castigado dos veces por el mismo delito. A la Relatora Especial le gustaría recordar que, según el principio de ‘ne bis in idem’, tal como está consagrado en el articulo 14-7 del Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos, nadie deberá ser sometido de nuevo a juicio por un delito por el cual ya ha sido condenado o absuelto de acuerdo con la ley y el procedimiento penal de cada país.” (ver http://wri-irg.org/node/20252)

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

A todos los Estados

3. Quién puede presentar información

Todo el mundo

4. Cuándo presentar la información

La información de casos individuales debe presentarse lo antes posible, sobre todo en casos se desea una acción urgente por parte del Procedimiento Especial.

Para cuestiones relacionadas con la legislación y prácticas estatales, la información puede enviarse en cualquier momento. Es también recomendable no perder de vista las visitas a nuestro país del Procedimiento Especial relevante, y presentar la información oportunamente antes de la visita programada, e intentar programar una reunión durante la visita. Una coalición de ONG puede tener mayores probabilidades de conseguir una reunión durante una visita al país que ONG individuales desconocidas hasta el momento para el Relator Especial.

5. Reglamentos especiales

La información puede presentarse por correo postal o electrónico, pero los envíos anónimos serán descartados. En los casos individuales, las presentaciones a los Procedimientos Especiales no son procesos cuasi judiciales, es decir, no tienen el objetivo de sustituir los procedimientos legales nacionales o internacionales. Por tanto, no es necesario que se hayan agotado los recursos internos.
Las denuncias de violaciones de los derechos humanos deben contener detalles claros y concisos sobre el caso, el nombre y otras informaciones identificativas de las víctimas individuales, información sobre las circunstancias, incluyendo -si está disponible- la fecha y el lugar de los incidentes, los supuestos autores, los supuestos motivos, y todos los pasos ya tomados a nivel, nacional, regional o internacional al respecto del caso.
Para hacer más fácil la presentación de denuncias de violaciones de derechos humanos, el Relator Especial ha elaborado un modelo de cuestionario, disponible en la siguiente dirección: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/religion/docs/questionnaire-s.doc

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tarda)

El Relator Especial puede acusar recibo del envío de información de personas individuales y organizaciones, pero a menudo no lo hace. Tampoco se le exige que informe a quienes aportan información de las medidas posteriores que ha tomado.
En caso de petición de acción urgente, la Oficina Central de Respuesta Rápida de la División de Procedimientos Especiales de la OACDH coordina el envío de comunicaciones por parte de todos los mandatos. Se pide a los gobiernos que proporcionen una respuesta sustancial a los llamamientos urgentes en un plazo de 30 días. Sólo en los casos adecuados la persona titular del mandato podría decidir hacer público el llamamiento urgente emitiendo una nota de prensa.
Normalmente, se pide a los gobiernos que contesten a las cartas de denuncia de violaciones de los derechos humanos en un plazo de dos meses.
En el informe conjunto de comunicaciones de los Procedimientos Especiales al Consejo de Derechos Humanos se puede encontrar normalmente un resumen de los llamamientos urgentes y las cartas de denuncias, así como las respuestas de los gobiernos. Esto incluye los nombres de las víctimas, a menos que haya razones concretas para que sigan siendo confidenciales. Es este caso, debemos explicar esas razones en nuestra presentación inicial.
Los informes de comunicaciones conjuntas pueden encontrarse en la siguiente dirección: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/SP/Pages/CommunicationsreportsSP.aspx.
Con la presentación del informe de comunicaciones conjuntas, el Relator Especial deja de añadir observaciones a los llamamientos urgentes o a las cartas de denuncia, y a las respuestas que se reciben de los gobiernos.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

El Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o Creencias tiene el mandato más estrechamente relacionado con la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, y aborda con gran frecuencia asuntos de objeción de conciencia.
El Relator Especial ha sido informado de la violación del derecho a la objeción de conciencia de objetores de conciencia individuales en varios casos, como por ejemplo Armenia, Turkmenistán, Eritrea y Azerbaiyán, entre otros (ver “precedentes” más adelante). La cuestión de la objeción de conciencia ha sido también planteada por el propio Relator Especial en el curso de varias visitas a países.
En el pasado, el Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o de Creencias ha llamado la atención de los gobiernos sobre la legislación internacional explícita (ver “fundamentos jurídico”), y ha urgido a los gobiernos a que cumplan los estándares internacionales reconociendo el derecho a la objeción de conciencia. En varios informes, el Relator ha subrayado el derechos de todas las personas a ejercer la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, tal como establece el artículo 18 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, así como el artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos.

Datos de contacto: 
La denuncia debe enviarse a: Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief c/o Office Of the High Commissioner for Human Rights United Nations at Geneva 8-14 Avenue de la Paix 1211 Geneva 10 Switzerland Fax: (+41 22) 917 90 06 E-mail: freedomofreligion@ohchr.org o a urgent-action@ohchr.org (incluir por favor en el campo 'asunto' del mensaje: Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief) Modelo de cuestionario (en inglés): http://www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/religion/docs/questionnaire-e.doc

Interpretations

Título Date
Objeción de conciencia al servicio militar (Resolución 1987/46) 10/03/1987

La Comisión reconoce “que la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar deriva de principios y razones de conciencia, incluyendo convicciones profundas procedentes de motivos religiosos, éticos, morales o similares”, y exhorta “a los Estados a reconocer que la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar debe considerarse como un ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, reconocido por la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos y el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos”.

Recomienda “a los Estados con sistema de servicio militar obligatorio, allí donde esta cláusula no ha sido establecida aun, que estudien la introducción de diferentes formas de servicio alternativo para los objetores de conciencia que sean compatibles con las motivaciones de la objeción de conciencia, sin olvidar que la experiencia de algunos Estados a este respecto, y que se abstengan de someter a estas personas a encarcelamiento”.

Declaración sobre la eliminación de todas las formas de intolerancia y discriminación fundadas en la religión o las convicciones 25/11/1981

El artículo 1 de la Declaración afirma:
1. Toda persona tiene derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, de conciencia y de religión. Este derecho incluye la libertad de tener una religión o cualesquiera convicciones de su elección, así como la libertad de manifestar su religión o sus convicciones individual o colectivamente, tanto en público como en privado, mediante el culto, la observancia, la práctica y la enseñanza.
2. Nadie será objeto de coacción que pueda menoscabar su libertad de tener una religión o convicciones de su elección.
3. La libertad de manifestar la propia religión o las propias convicciones estará sujeta únicamente a las limitaciones que prescriba la ley y que sean necesarias para proteger la seguridad, el orden, la salud o la moral públicos o los derechos y libertades fundamentales de los demás.

Informes y observaciones
Título Date
Informe de la Relatora Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o de Creencias, Asma Jahangir. Apéndice – Misión en Azerbaiyán 18/10/2006

101. Respecto al derecho a la objeción de conciencia, la Relatora Especial urge al Gobierno a que cumpla el compromiso adquirido ante la Consejo de Europa y que promulgue legislación sobre el servicio alternativo en aplicación de las disposiciones de su propia Constitución, que garantiza dicho derecho.

Armenia: comunicación enviada el 9 de junio de 2005 27/03/2006

10. La Relatora Especial agradece la contestación del Gobierno. Le gustaría llamar la atención del gobierno sobre el párrafo 5º de la Resolución 1998/77 de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos, que subraya que los Estados deberían tomar las medidas necesarias para evitar someter a encarcelamiento a los objetores de conciencia.
11. Además, la Relatora Especial hace notar que el Comité de Derechos Humanos ha alentado a los Estados a que garanticen que la duración del servicio alternativo no tiene un carácter punitivo, en comparación con la duración del servicio militar ordinario. (ver inter alia CCPR/CO/83/GRC, pár. 15). Siendo consciente del compromiso de Armenia respecto al servicio alternativo tras su incorporación al Consejo de Europa, la Relatora Especial alienta al Gobierno a iniciar una revisión de la ley desde la perspectiva de su compatibilidad con los estándares internacionales y las buenas prácticas.

Azerbaiyán: comunicación enviada el 17 de marzo de 2005 27/03/2006

25 La Relatora Especial está agradecida por la detallada respuesta en relación a Mahir Baghirov. Sin embargo, le gustaría llamar la atención del Gobierno sobre el artículo 1 de la Resolución 1998/77 de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos, que se centra en el derecho de toda persona a tener objeciones de conciencia al servicio militar. El derecho no está limitado ni debería limitarse a miembros del clero y estudiantes de escuelas religiosas. La Relatora Especial alienta al Gobierno a que revise su legislación sobre el servicio alternativo, en concordancia con los estándares internacionales y las buenas prácticas.

Comunicación: Gobierno: Grecia, enviada el 9 de junio de 2005 27/03/2006

138. La Relatora Especial está agradecida por la detallada respuesta a su comunicación. Sin embargo, quiere destacar con preocupación los estrictos límites temporales para solicitar el estatus de objetor de conciencia. A este respecto, la Relatora Especial llama la atención del Gobierno sobre la Recomendación del Consejo de Europa 1518(2001), que invita a los Estados miembros a introducir en su legislación ‘el derecho a ser reconocido como objetor de conciencia en cualquier momento antes, durante o después de la conscripción o realización del servicio militar’. Esto reconoce que la objeción de conciencia puede desarrollarse con el tiempo, incluso después de que una persona haya participado en actividades de entrenamiento militar.“

República de Corea: comunicación enviada el 24 de mayo de 2005 27/03/2006

292. La Relatora Especial ha recibido informaciones de que 1030 Testigos de Jehová han sido encarcelados en la República de Corea debido a que se han negado a hacer el servicio militar por motivos relacionados con sus creencias religiosas.” (...)

305. La Relatora Especial agradece la detallada respuesta del Gobierno. También toma nota de la postura del Gobierno respecto a los objetores de conciencia mediante el tercer Informe de Estado Parte, que presentó al Comité de Derechos Humanos en febrero de 2005 (CCPR/C/KOR/2005/3). Aunque la Relatora Especial hace notar que el servicio militar a veces puede ser necesario para los objetivos de la seguridad nacional, le gustaría llamar la atención del Gobierno sobre el párrafo 11º de la Observación General nº 22 del Comité de Derechos Humanos, que establece que aunque el Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos ‘no hace referencia explícitamente a un derecho a la objeción de conciencia, el Comité está convencido que tal derecho puede derivarse del artículo 18, en la medida en que la obligación de usar la fuerza letal puede entrar gravemente en conflicto con la libertad de conciencia y el derecho a expresar la religión o creencias propias."

Informe preliminar del Relator Especial de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos sobre la eliminación de toda forma de intolerancia y de discriminación basada en la religión o en las creencias. Apéndice 1. Situación en Turquía 11/08/2000

139. Finalmente, en concordancia con las resoluciones de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos (por ejemplo la Resolución 1998/77, que reconoce el derecho de toda persona a tener objeciones de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión) y la Observación General nº 22 (48) del 20 de julio de 1993 de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos, y sobre la base de la Constitución Turca, que consagra la libertad de creencias, el Relator Especial cree que las características y tensiones regionales no son suficientes para justificar, ni en Turquía ni en cualquier otro lugar, un rechazo categórico de la objeción de conciencia, y recomienda que se apruebe legislación que garantice el derecho a la objeción de conciencia, en especial por motivos religiosos.

Informe de comunicaciones, Corea del Sur 15/02/2000

87. El Relator Especial, aunque entiende las preocupaciones de la República de Corea, desea recordar que la Comisión de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, en varias resoluciones, como por ejemplo la resolución 1998/77, ha reconocido el derecho de toda persona a tener objeciones de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia, y religión, como se establece en el artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos y la Observación General nº 22 (48) del Comité de Derechos Humanos. También recordaba a los Estados con sistema de servicio militar obligatorio, allí donde está disposición no se ha hecho todavía, la recomendación de que proporcionen a los objetores de conciencia varias formas de servicio alternativo que sean compatibles con los motivos de su objeción de conciencia, de carácter civil o no combatiente, de interés social y de carácter no punitivo. Además, debería señalarse en virtud del artículo 4 del Pacto internacional sobre Derechos Civiles y Políticos que la libertad de creencias no puede ser sometida a limitaciones, entendiendo que eso es distinto de la libertad de manifestar una creencia, lo cual puede sufrir limitaciones como establece la legislación internacional.

Informe del Relator Especial sobre Libertad de Religión o de Creencias: visita a Grecia 07/11/1996

40. El Relator Especial llama la atención sobre la resolución 1989/59, de 8 de marzo de 1989 de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, reafirmada inter alia en 1991 (resolución 1993/84 de 10 de marzo de 1993), que reconoce 'el derecho de toda persona a tener objeciones de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, como establece dispone el artículo 18 de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos, así como el artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional sobre los Derechos Sociales y Políticos' (párr. 1), y que recomienda a los Estados miembros 'con un sistema de servicio militar obligatorio, allí donde tales disposiciones no hayan sido ya hechas, que introduzcan varias formas de servicio alternativo para los objetores de conciencia' (párr. 3), el cual 'debería ser en principio de naturaleza no combatiente o civil, de interés público y no de carácter punitivo' (párr. 4).

Informe preliminar sobre la eliminación de toda forma de intolerancia religiosa preparado por el Relator Especial de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos 16/10/1997

3. El derecho a la objeción de conciencia
77. Respecto a la tercera categoría de violaciones, el Relator Especial desea reiterar que el derecho a la objeción de conciencia es un derecho íntimamente ligado con la libertad de religión.
78. El Relator Especial considera necesario recordar a los Estados de la Comisión de Derechos Humanos la resolución 1989/59, refrendada varias veces, que reconoce el derecho de toda persona a tener objeciones de conciencia al servicio militar como ejercicio legítimo del derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión, como establece dispone el artículo 18 de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos, así como el artículo 18 del Pacto Internacional sobre los Derechos Sociales y Políticos. Por ello, la Comisión recomienda a los Estados con un sistema de servicio militar obligatorio, allí donde tales disposiciones no hayan sido ya hechas, que introduzcan varias formas de servicio alternativo para los objetores de conciencia, el cual debería ser en principio de naturaleza no combatiente o civil, de interés público y no de carácter punitivo. En su resolución 1984/93 sobre objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, la Comisión de Derechos Humanos reclamó garantías mínimas para asegurar que el estatus de objetor de conciencia pueda ser solicitado en cualquier momento.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias

Resumen:

El Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias, establecido como Procedimiento Especial en 1991, bajo el mandato de la antigua Comisión de Derechos Humanos de la ONU (reemplazada por el Consejo de Derechos Humanos en 2006), investiga casos de personas detenidas arbitrariamente en todo el mundo. Recibe información sobre supuestos casos de detención arbitraria de individuos afectados directamente, sus familias, sus representantes u ONG, y envía llamamientos urgentes y comunicaciones a los Gobiernos implicados para aclarar las condiciones de los que han sido supuestamente detenidos. Según este mandato, el Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias examina casos en los que no ha habido bases legales para la detención, casos en los que el derecho a un juicio justo ha sido tan gravemente violado que invalida la posterior detención, y casos de presos de conciencia.

Algunos ejemplos del tipo de asuntos que estudia el Grupo de Trabajo:

  • detención que se deriva de un incumplimiento fundamental de los derechos humanos, como la libertad de expresión o la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión;
  • excesivo tiempo de detención provisional antes de ser llevado ante un juez;
  • cuando una persona es detenida cuando debería haber sido puesta en libertad;
  • arresto domiciliario.

Además, el Grupo de Trabajo lleva a cabo visitas a países que enviaron una invitación y presenta informes anuales al Consejo de Derechos Humanos.

Existe una base de datos en línea de documentos del Grupo de Trabajo en http://www.unwgaddatabase.org/un/

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

a) Casos individuales

Cuando el Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias recibe información de casos de supuestas detenciones arbitrarias, puede enviar o bien un llamamiento urgente o una carta de denuncia al gobierno implicado. Cuando el Grupo de Trabajo decide hacer pública su opinión sobre un caso, la respuesta recibida por parte de un gobierno será reenviada a la fuente original para ser comentada. Estas opiniones se transmiten al Consejo de Derechos Humanos y se publican en el sitio web del Grupo de Trabajo en http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/dpage_e.aspx?m=117 y en la base de datos en línea: http://www.unwgaddatabase.org/un/.

Las opiniones del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias son cuasi judiciales, en el sentido de que no son jurídicamente vinculantes, pero son razonadas como las decisiones legales y serán consideradas por otros organismos especiales de la ONU como el Comité de Derechos Humanos.

Acción urgente

En casos en los que existan suficientes denuncias fiables de que una persona pueda haber sido detenida arbitrariamente, y que las supuestas violaciones puedan ser dependientes del tiempo en términos de pérdida de vidas, situaciones de vida o muerte, o bien daños inminentes o en curso de carácter muy grave en caso de que continúe la detención, el Grupo de Trabajo transmite un llamamiento urgente al Gobierno. Un llamamiento urgente no prejuzga la opinión que el Grupo de Trabajo pueda posteriormente emitir respecto al caso.

b) Legislación y prácticas de los Estados

Aunque el foco del mandato del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias está en los casos individuales, también examina la legislación y prácticas estatales. El Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias desarrolla al menos dos visitas a países anualmente, durante las cuales hablará sobre cuestiones relacionadas con la detención arbitraria con el gobierno del país. Después de la visita a un país, el Grupo de Trabajo hará observaciones sobre la información recibida del gobierno, las ONG y las personas individuales, y hará recomendaciones al gobierno.
Los informes de las visitas están disponibles en línea en http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Detention/Pages/Visits.aspx, y se envían al Consejo de Derechos Humanos.

2. A qué países se aplica el mecanismo

A todos los Estados

3. Quién puede presentar información

Todo el mundo

4. Cuándo presentar la información

La información sobre casos individuales debe presentarse lo antes posible, sobre todo en casos en los que se desea una acción urgente por parte del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias.
La información sobre leyes y prácticas de los Estados puede presentarse en cualquier momento, pero adquirirá mayor relevancia si se presenta antes de una visita planeada al país por parte del Grupo de Trabajo.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

Según los métodos del Grupo de Trabajo revisados, la presentación tiene que hacerse por escrito, y tiene que incluir el nombre y dirección de la persona y/o organización que presenta la información.
La comunicación debe tener cómo mínimo:

  • fecha de la detención
  • lugar de la detención
  • acusación formal si la hubiere
  • contacto con abogado defensor/organización externa/familia, etc.
  • fecha de declaración ante un juez, si corresponde
  • fecha e información sobre el juicio, si corresponde.

El Grupo de Trabajo prefiere recibir información usando este modelo de cuestionario, que está disponible en http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Detention/WGADQuestionnaire_sp.pdf.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tarda)

Cuando recibe información de un caso de detención arbitraria, el Grupo de Trabajo envía una comunicación al Gobierno implicado, que incluye la información que el Grupo de Trabajo. El Gobierno es requerido para que responda a esta carta en un plazo de 60 días, pero puede pedir una prórroga de no más de un mes. La respuesta recibida por el Grupo de Trabajo es reenviada a la fuente para ser comentada.
Según la información recibida, el Grupo de Trabajo puede tomar una de las siguientes medidas:

  • Si la persona ha sido puesta en libertad, el caso puede ser archivado, pero el Grupo de Trabajo se reserva el derecho de emitir una opinión, se haya liberado a la persona o no;
  • si el Grupo de Trabajo considera que se requiere información complementaria, puede dejar el caso en espera y solicitar más información;
  • si el Grupo de Trabajo tiene información suficiente, emitirá una opinión, que puede afirmar que o bien la detención fue arbitraria o bien no. Incluso en ausencia de una contestación por parte del Estado, el Grupo de Trabajo puede emitir una opinión, si considera suficiente la información recibida de la fuente.

Según la complejidad del caso, el tiempo que tarda el Grupo de Trabajo en llegar a una decisión final varía entre 6 y 24 meses.
Cualquier opinión se envía antes al Gobierno implicado y dos semanas después, a la fuente.
Las opiniones se publican en un apéndice del informe anual del Grupo de Trabajo al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, y también están disponibles en el sitio web del Grupo de Trabajo en http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Detention/Pages/Complaints.aspx y http://www.unwgaddatabase.org/.
En casos excepcionales, el Grupo de Trabajo puede reconsiderar una opinión a petición de la fuente o del Gobierno, por ejemplo si los hechos han cambiado o tienen que ser considerados como totalmente nuevos, de manera que el Grupo de Trabajo se habría formado otra opinión de haber conocido los hechos en su momento. Los gobiernos solamente pueden solicitar una revisión si contestaron a la denuncia original dentro del plazo de tiempo mencionado antes.

Cuando se trata de un caso urgente, el Grupo de Trabajo envía un llamamiento urgente al Gobierno implicado para garantizar que se respeta el derecho a la vida y a la integridad física y psicológica de la persona detenida. El Grupo de Trabajo instará al Gobierno a salvaguardar el derecho a no ser privado de la libertad arbitrariamente.
Un llamamiento urgente a un Gobierno no prefigura de ninguna manera la valoración final del caso del Grupo de Trabajo, a menos que el carácter arbitrario de la privación de libertad ya haya sido establecido.
Los llamamientos urgentes y las respuestas de los gobiernos serán incluidos en el informe conjunto ordinario de comunicaciones de todos los Procedimientos Especiales al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, accesible en http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/SP/Pages/CommunicationsreportsSP.aspx.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

El Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias ha sido usado con éxito por objetores de conciencia. Su primera opinión conocida fue acerca del caso del objetor de conciencia turco Osman Murat Ülke (Opinión nº 36/1999 (Turquía)), que fue encarcelado repetidamente por desobedecer órdenes. En consonancia con los estándares internacionales en ese momento, el Grupo de Trabajo consideró todas las detenciones a partir de la segunda como arbitrarias, contrarias al principio de ne bis in idem. El gobierno turco solicitó una revisión de esta Opinión en 2000, pero el Grupo de Trabajo mantuvo su opinión original (ver Informe del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias, 20 de diciembre de 2000).

En 2003, el Grupo de Trabajo emitió una opinión similar en cinco casos en Israel.

De acuerdo al desarrollo de la jurisprudencia del Comité de Derechos Humanos, desde 2008 en adelante el Grupo de Trabajo consideró arbitrarias todas la detenciones de objetores de conciencia (ver Opinión nº 16/2008 (Turquía)) y la Opinión nº 8/2008: (Colombia)).

En su Opinión nº 8/2008, el Grupo de Trabajo llegó también a la conclusión de que la extendida práctica de las “batidas” en Colombia (redadas sobre jóvenes en espacios públicos) para aplicar el estatus militar a los jóvenes y su posterior traslado a cuarteles militares, constituyen detenciones arbitrarias. Después planteó este tema al gobierno de Colombia durante su visita al país del 1 al 10 de octubre de 2008 (ver Informe sobre la Misión en Colombia, 16 de febrero de 2009).

Datos de contacto: 
Para casos individuales, la comunicación debe enviarse -acompañada si es posible por el modelo de cuestionario preparado a tal fin- a: Working Group on Arbitrary Detention c/o Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights United Nations Office at Geneva 8-14, avenue de la Paix 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland fax: +41-22-9179006 e-mail: wgad@ohchr.org Las comunicaciones que soliciten al Grupo de Trabajo que emita un llamamiento urgente por motivos humanitarios deben enviarse a la dirección anterior, preferiblemente por correo electrónico o fax.
Lecturas complementarias: 
Precedentes (Opiniones e Informes)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Procedimiento de Denuncia del Consejo de Derechos Humanos

Resumen:

El Procedimiento de Denuncia del Consejo de Derechos Humanos es un procedimiento confidencial para abordar violaciones de los derechos humanos flagrantes y fehacientemente probadas. Por ello no es adecuado para casos individuales excepto cuando son representativos de un patrón de violaciones de los derechos humanos fehacientemente probadas.
El Procedimiento de Denuncia es de naturaleza confidencial y la presentación de comunicaciones no se hace público. Aunque el denunciante puede ser informado de si una denuncia ha sido aceptada en el procedimiento, los pasos dados y el resultado de la denuncia serán confidenciales, a menos que el Consejo de Derechos Humanos decida estudiar la denuncia en público.

El Procedimiento de Denuncia fue establecido por la resolución 5/1 del Consejo de Derechos Humanos – Consejo de Derechos Humanos: creación de instituciones - del 18 de junio de 2007, y reemplaza al antiguo procedimiento 1503.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Si se acepta una denuncia después de un primer filtrado por parte del Grupo de Trabajo de Comunicaciones, la denuncia de violaciones de derechos humanos será transmitida al Estado implicado. Un Grupo de Trabajo del Consejo de Derechos Humanos (el Grupo de Trabajo de Situaciones) estudiará entonces la denuncia y la respuesta del Estado, y hará una recomendación al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, el cual estudiará el informe del Grupo de Trabajo de manera confidencial, a menos que decida otra cosa.

El Consejo de Derechos Humanos puede tomar una de las siguientes medidas:

  • dejar de estudiar la situación si no se necesitan acciones adicionales;
  • mantener la situación a examen y solicitar información adicional del Estado implicado;
  • mantener la situación a examen y nombrar un experto independiente para que haga un seguimiento de la situación e informe al Consejo;
  • dejar de tener la situación examinada bajo el procedimiento de denuncia confidencial para examinarla a la luz pública;
  • recomendar a la OACDH que ayude al Estado implicado.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

A todos los Estados.

3. Quién puede enviar información

Las denuncias a través del Procedimiento de Denuncia pueden ser presentadas al Consejo de Derechos Humanos por personas individuales y por ONG con o sin estatus consultivo. Las denuncias anónimas pueden no ser admitidas a trámite.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Las denuncias pueden presentarse en cualquier momento. Sin embargo, deben haberse agotado los recursos locales, a menos que tales recursos fueran inefectivos o desproporcionadamente largos. La denuncia tampoco debería hacer referencia a un patrón de violaciones de derechos humanos que ya esté siendo abordado por uno de los Procedimientos Especiales, un organismo de tratado u otros procedimientos de denuncia de la ONU o regionales similares.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

El Procedimiento de Denuncia sólo puede tramitar denuncias presentadas por escrito. Es recomendable limitar la extensión de la denuncia a entre 10 y 15 páginas, a las que se puede sumar información adicional en fases posteriores.
Como las denuncias anónimas no pueden ser admitidas, es crucial incluir la identificación de la(s) persona(s) u organización(es) que presenta(n) la comunicación (esta información será confidencial, si se solicita).
Las denuncias presentadas al Procedimiento de Denuncia deben incluir una descripción de los hechos relevantes con el mayor detalle posible, aportando nombres de las supuestas víctimas, fechas, lugares y otras pruebas. También deben incluir el motivo de la denuncia y los derechos supuestamente violados.
Todas las comunicaciones mal fundamentadas o anónimas serán descartadas.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tarda)

Después de que el Grupo de Trabajo de Comunicaciones hace un filtrado inicial y una decisión sobre si la denuncia se admite a trámite o no, se envía una solicitud de información al Estado implicado, que deberá responder en tres meses como máximo. Si es necesario, este plazo puede ampliarse.

El Grupo de Trabajo de Situación prepara entonces un informe al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, normalmente en forma de un borrador de resolución o de decisión sobre la situación tratada en la denuncia. También puede decidir mantener a examen la situación y solicitar información adicional.

El Consejo de Derechos Humanos decide de manera confidencial qué medidas tomar con la frecuencia que sea necesaria, pero al menos una vez al año. Por regla general, el periodo de tiempo entre la transmisión de la denuncia al Estado implicado y su estudio por parte del Consejo no debería exceder los 24 meses.

Tanto el material aportado por las personas individuales como las respuestas de los gobiernos son confidenciales durante y después su estudio por parte del Procedimiento de Denuncia. Esto se aplica también a las decisiones que se toman en las diferentes fases del procedimiento.

Por ello es importante no hacer público que se ha presentado un caso al Procedimiento de Denuncia.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Hasta donde saben las personas autoras de esta guía, este mecanismo todavía no ha sido utilizado para el tema de la objeción de conciencia. Sin embargo, podría haber influido en la decisión del Consejo de Derechos Humanos de nombrar un Relator Especial sobre Eritrea en 2012.

Datos de contacto: 
Las comunicaciones dirigidas al Procedimiento de Denuncia del Consejo deben remitirse a la siguiente dirección: Human Rights Council and Treaties Division Complaint Procedure OHCHR-UNOG 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland Fax: +41-22-917 90 11 E-mail: CP@ohchr.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
Decisions

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Africa: Overview

In Africa there are two regional human rights systems potentially of interest to conscientious objectors to military service: the African Union and especially its African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights and the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child as bodies covering the entire African continent, and the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) and its Community Court of Justice as a sub-regional mechanism.

The African Union grew out of the Organisation for African Unity (OAU), and was founded in 1999. One of its objectives is to “promote and protect human and peoples' rights in accordance with the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights and other relevant human rights instruments”. While one of the organs of the African Union is the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights, individuals can only bring cases if a State party has made a declaration that this is the case. As of April 2012, only five states had made such a Declaration. Those countries are Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi, Mali, and Tanzania. Therefore, the African Court is presently not included in this guide. More information on the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights is available at http://www.african-court.org.

A list of member states of the African Union is available at http://www.au.int/en/member_states/countryprofiles.

While the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) is mainly a organisation for economic cooperation, its Community Court of Justice has jurisdiction to determine cases of violations of human rights that occur in any Member State of ECOWAS.

A list of member states of ECOWAS is available at http://www.courtecowas.org/site/index.php?option=com_content&view=articl....

Other sub-regional institutions are less relevant to human rights, and especially to conscientious objection to military service.

At the time of writing, the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) of the East African Community has no jurisdiction over human rights. The Council of the East African Community, however, might extend the Court's jurisdiction at a later date. More information on the East African Court of Justice can be found at http://www.eacj.org. Information on the East African Community and a list of member states can be found at http://www.eac.int/.

The Court of Justice of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) does not have jurisdiction over human rights issues, as the treaty establishing COMESA does not include human rights. Information on COMESA is available at http://about.comesa.int.

The Southern African Development Community Tribunal (SADC Tribunal) has some jurisdiction over human rights, although it is not a human rights court per se. The Tribunal has ruled that it does have jurisdiction to entertain human rights matters as one of the principles of the Southern African Development Community is the observance of human rights, democracy and rule of law. More information on the SADC Tribunal is available at http://www.sadc-tribunal.org.

To our knowledge none of the African human rights systems has so far been used to advance the right to conscientious objection to military service in an African country. There is no established standard relating to conscientious objection under any of the African system, so they should be used with caution. If you want to engage in standard setting in one of the African human systems, we recommend that you get in touch with one of the organisations listed below:

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos: Panorama general

La Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos (ACHPR) de 1981, que entró en vigor en 1986, es el más antiguo instrumento de derechos humanos de África, y estableció la Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos.

El artículo 8 de la ACHPR declara: “La libertad de conciencia, la profesión y libre práctica de la religión están garantizadas. Nadie puede, dentro del respeto a la ley y el orden, ser sometido a medidas que limiten el ejercicio de estas libertades.” El derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar podría derivarse de este artículo, de manera análoga al artículo 18 del PIDCP y el artículo 9 de la Convención Europea de Derechos Humanos.

Otras disposiciones potencialmente relevantes de la ACHPR son el artículo 2 (no discriminación), el artículo 5 (tortura), el artículo 7 (derecho a un juicio justo), el artículo 10 (derecho de asociación), y el artículo 16 (derecho a la educación), entre otros. El texto completo de la ACHPR se puede consultar en http://www.achpr.org/instruments/achpr/.

La Comisión Africana se encarga oficialmente de las siguientes tres funciones principales:

  • la protección de los derechos humanos y de los pueblos
  • la promoción de los derechos humanos y de los pueblos
  • la interpretación de la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos

Está formada por 11 miembros elegidos por la Asamblea de la UA entre expertos nombrados por los Estados miembros de la Carta.

Como en los órganos ligados a tratados de las Naciones Unidas y el Consejo de Derechos Humanos, la Comisión Africana ha establecido varios procedimientos para vigilar y proteger los derechos humanos, como por ejemplo:

Los Mecanismos Especiales también llevan a cabo visitas a países para explorar y hablar de la situación de los derechos humanos en un determinado país.

Los Mecanismos Especiales relevantes podrían ser:

Para una visión general de los Mecanismos Especiales, visitar http://www.achpr.org/mechanisms/.

La Comisionada actual es Catherine Dupe Atoki (desde 2007).

Datos de contacto: 
African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights 31 Bijilo Annex Layout, Kombo North District Western Region P.O. Box 673 Banjul The Gambia Tel: +220-441 05 05, 441 05 06 Fax: +220-441 05 04 E-mail: au-banjul@africa-union.org Sitio web: http://www.achpr.org/

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos: Procedimiento de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados

Resumen

Según la ACHPR, los Estados tiene la obligación de presentar informes a la Comisión Africana sobre las medidas tomadas para garantizar que los derechos consagrados en la Carta Africana están siendo ejercidos. El procedimiento de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados se considera un diálogo en el cual el Estado implicado y la Comisión Africana intercambian sus opiniones. La Comisión Africana publica el informe del Estado antes de la sesión para dar oportunidad a la sociedad civil de hacer comentarios sobre el informe del Estado.

El informe del Estado se examina en público y, a continuación del diálogo, la Comisión Africana emite unas “Observaciones/Comentarios Finales” para el Estado en cuestión. El informe del Estado y las Observaciones/Comentarios Finales se transmiten a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA, y sólo posteriormente son publicadas por la Comisión Africana.

Hasta ahora, la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar no ha sido tratada por la Comisión Africana.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Durante el estudio de los informes de los Estados, la Comisión Africana también se basa en información aportada por las ONG, y puede plantear cuestiones basándose en esta información. Puede entonces incluir un tema en sus Observaciones Finales y hacer recomendaciones al Estado en cuestión. Las Observaciones Finales son transmitidas al Estado en cuestión y forman parte del Informe de Actividad de la Comisión Africana.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

El mecanismo se aplica a los Estados que han ratificado la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos.

3. Quién puede presentar información

De acuerdo a la punto 74 del Reglamento de la Comisión Africana, “las partes interesadas que deseen contribuir al examen del informe y la situación de los derechos humanos en el país en cuestión” pueden presentar información. Esto no está restringido a las ONG con estatus de observador con la Comisión Africana.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

La información debe enviarse a la Comisión Africana como mínimo 60 días antes del examen de un informe estatal. Sin embargo, como el Secretariado de la Comisión Africana tiene que transmitir una lista de cuestiones al Estado en cuestión como mínimo 6 semanas antes de la sesión, es recomendable presentar la información al menos 3-4 meses antes del examen del informe.

La información de las próximas sesiones de la Comisión Africana está accesible en http://www.achpr.org/sessions/.La información sobre Estados concretos, además de los informes estatales, Observaciones Finales de la Comisión Africana e informes de las ONG, están disponibles en http://www.achpr.org/states/. Sin embargo, en el sitio web aparece a menudo “Observaciones Finales: disponibles”, pero no proporciona ningún enlace.

5. Consejos especiales para presentar información a este mecanismo

Aunque no existe un formato establecido para los informes de las ONG, es útil organizar la estructura del informe alrededor de los derechos enumerados en la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos. Es importante hacer referencia al informe del Estado, o a su ausencia, y comentar la información aportada por el Estado.

Aunque el marco de referencia de la Comisión Africana es la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos, puede ser útil hacer referencia a los estándares y jurisprudencia desarrollada por otros sistemas de derechos humanos en relación a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, ya que esta cuestión no ha sido tratada hasta el momento por la Comisión Africana.

Puede ser útil redactar preguntas sugiriendo que sean formuladas por los miembros de la Comisión, organizadas por tema y disposición de la Carta, e incluirlas en el informe de la ONG.

Hacer presión antes y durante la sesión

Es recomendable no limitarse sólo a presentar un informe, sino también contactar con la Comisión Africana antes, durante y después del estudio del informe del Estado. Puede ser útil identificar al comisario a cargo de nuestro país e intentar crear una relación de colaboración y participación durante todo el proceso. En circunstancias normales, el comisario a cargo de las actividades promocionales en el Estado en cuestión será también el relator que conducirá el debate sobre el informe.

Las ONG pueden aprovecharse también de la facultad de las organizaciones con estatus de observador para hacer comentarios sobre otros puntos del orden del día, para tratar el contenido de un informe estatal concreto. Muchos temas planteados por los informes pueden tratarse bien mediante un punto en el orden de día sobre la situación de los derechos humanos en África, bien en uno de los puntos temáticos del orden del día.

Reuniones formales e informales con las ONG

Las ONG pueden también considerar la organización de actividades complementarias o reuniones privadas con los comisarios como foros alternativos para entrar en conversación sobre el contenido de los informes estatales.

6. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

No

7. Qué ocurre con las presentaciones (cuánto tardan)

La Comisión Africana examina 3 ó 4 informes estatales durante cada una de sus sesiones ordinarias. La Secretaría de la Comisión elabora una lista de preguntas basada en la información recibida del Estado y de otras fuentes, incluidas ONG. La lista de preguntas se transmiten al Estado en cuestión al menos 6 semanas antes de la sesión, junto con un petición de enviar un “funcionario de alto rango” a la sesión. El estudio del informe del Estado se realiza en el curso de una reunión pública de la Comisión Africana, en forma de diálogo con los representantes del Estado en cuestión. Tras el diálogo, la Comisión se reúne a puerta cerrada para hablar de sus observaciones y recomendaciones.

El informe del Estado y los Comentarios/Observaciones se transmiten a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA, y son publicados por la Comisión Africana posteriormente.

8. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta el momento para tratar la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar.

Datos de contacto: 
African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights 31 Bijilo Annex Layout, Kombo North District Western Region P.O. Box 673 Banjul The Gambia Tel: +220-441 05 05, 441 05 06 Fax: +220-441 05 04 E-mail: : au-banjul@africa-union.org Sitio web: http://www.achpr.org/
Lecturas complementarias: 
Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos: Procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones

Resumen

De acuerdo a los artículos 55 y 56 de la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos, cualquier persona puede presentar información o comunicaciones ante la Comisión Africana. Presentando una comunicación a la Comisión Africana pueden conseguir ayuda las víctimas de abusos de derechos humanos que por razones diversas no hayan obtenido justicia en sus propios países después de haber agotado todos los recursos legales disponibles. Los casos presentados a la Comisión Africana no deben presentarse al mismo tiempo a otro sistema de derechos humanos.

Antes de que la Comisión Africana investigue el fondo de la denuncia llamará la atención del Estado en cuestión sobre la cuestión. Sin embargo, la persona denunciante puede especificar si desea permanecer en el anonimato (aunque la propia denuncia no puede presentarse anónimamente).

Antes de tomar una decisión sobre el fondo de la denuncia, la Comisión Africana puede pedir al Estado en cuestión que tome medidas provisionales para evitar daños irreparables a la víctima o víctimas de las supuestas violaciones con la urgencia que exija la situación.

Después de investigar una denuncia, la Comisión Africana hace una recomendación al Estado o Estados en cuestión para garantizar que las violaciones de derechos humanos son investigadas, que las víctimas son resarcidas (si es necesario) y que se toman medidas para evitar que vuelvan a ocurrir las violaciones de los derechos humanos. La Comisión Africana también ofrece su mediación para conseguir acuerdos amistosos en el caso.

Las recomendaciones de la Comisión Africana se presentan ante la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la Unión Africana para su aprobación.

Todas las medidas que toma la Comisión Africana son confidenciales, a menos que la Asamblea decida lo contrario. De todos modos, el informe se publica tras la aprobación por parte de la Asamblea.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Tras la presentación de una comunicación, la Comisión Africana toma primero una decisión sobre si la admite a trámite. Si se admite a trámite una denuncia, la Comisión Africana estudia la denuncia, decide sobre el fondo del caso, y hace recomendaciones al Estado en cuestión. Esto puede consistir en una compensación a las víctimas de las violaciones de derechos humanos y medidas para evitar que vuelvan a ocurrir.

Para evitar daños irreparables a las víctimas de la supuesta violación con la urgencia que exija la situación, la Comisión Africana puede solicitar al Estado en cuestión que tome medidas provisionales antes de que haya una decisión sobre el fondo de la denuncia.

Además de decidir sobre el fondo del caso, la Comisión Africana también está disponible para alcanzar un acuerdo amistoso en el caso.

Las recomendaciones de la Comisión Africana se presentan ante la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la Unión Africana para su aprobación.

Todas las medidas que toma la Comisión Africana son confidenciales, a menos que la Asamblea decida lo contrario. De todos modos, el informe se publica tras la aprobación por parte de la Asamblea.

2. A qué Estados se aplica el mecanismo

Este mecanismo se aplica a todos los Estados parte de la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos (ACHPR). El estado de las ratificaciones de la Carta puede consultarse en a
http://www.achpr.org/instruments/achpr/ratification/.

Pueden plantearse denuncias contra cualquier Estado que tenga competencias sobre la víctima en el momento de la violación, y que a la vez haya ratificado la Carta Africana.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Según el artículo 55 de la Carta Africana, la Comisión Africana puede recibir comunicaciones de cualquiera, incluidas personas individuales y ONG.

Aunque la parte denunciante puede pedir permanecer en el anonimato, las denuncias no pueden presentarse anónimamente. Es necesario incluir en ellas el nombre y la dirección de la parte denunciante y tiene que estar firmada.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Las denuncias deben presentarse en la Comisión Africana en un plazo de tiempo razonable tras haber agotado los recursos legales locales. Después de agotar los recursos locales, o al comprobar que se prolongan excesivamente, la parte denunciante puede presentar la denuncia a la Comisión Africana inmediatamente. La Carta Africana no menciona ningún plazo máximo, pero habla de un periodo de tiempo razonable. Por ello es siempre recomendable presentar las denuncias lo más pronto posible.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

Cómo redactar las denuncias:

El procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones de la Comisión Africana es directo y no exige contar con representación legal. La denuncia puede presentarla la víctima de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos u otra persona actuando en su nombre, o cualquier grupo de personas, incluyendo las ONG.

Para que una denuncia sea admitida a trámite tiene que cumplir los siguientes requisitos:

  • El nombre, la nacionalidad y la firma de la personas o personas que la cumplimentan, o en el caso de las ONG, los nombres y las firmas de los representantes legales;
  • si la persona denunciante desea que su identidad sea ocultada al Estado implicado;
  • una dirección postal, a ser posible también un número de fax y/o correo electrónico
  • una descripción detallada de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos, especificando la fecha, lugar y naturaleza de las supuestas violaciones;
  • el nombre del Estado que supuestamente ha violado la Carta Africana;
  • todos los pasos dados para agotar los recursos legales locales, o una explicación de por qué el agotamiento de esos recursos sería excesivamente largo o inefectivo;
  • una indicación de que la denuncia no ha sido enviada a otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos.

Es recomendable hacer referencia a las disposiciones de la Carta Africana que se supone han sido violadas, aunque esto no es estrictamente necesario. La hoja informativa nº 2 de la Comisión Africana incluye directrices para la presentación de las comunicaciones (ver http://www.achpr.org/files/pages/communications/guidelines/achpr_infoshe...).

Procedimientos de emergencia:

Las comunicaciones deben indicar si la vida, la integridad física o la salud de las víctimas están en peligro inminente. En tal caso, la Comisión Africana tiene competencias para adoptar medidas provisionales, apremiando al Estado en cuestión para que no emprenda ninguna acción que pueda causar daños irreparables a las víctimas hasta que el caso haya sido considerado por la Comisión Africana. La Comisión Africana también puede adoptar otras medidas urgentes si lo cree conveniente.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Una vez que se ha presentado una comunicación a la Secretaría de la Comisión Africana, será registrada y la Secretaría acusará recibo de la comunicación. Como primer paso, la Comisión tiene que ser “atrapada” por la comunicación, lo que significa que la Comisión decide tratarla como muy tarde durante la primera sesión posterior a la recepción de la comunicación. Cuando la Comisión ha sido “atrapada” por la comunicación se informa de ello a a parte denunciante y al Estado parte, que tienen tres meses para hacer comentarios sobre la comunicación y su admisión a trámite. En la siguiente sesión de la Comisión Africana se tomará una decisión respecto a la admisión a trámite de la denuncia.

Si no existe acuerdo amistoso, la Secretaría de la Comisión Africana prepara un borrador de decisión sobre el fondo del caso, teniendo en cuenta todos los hechos a su disposición. Esto tiene el objetivo de guiar las deliberaciones de los miembros de la Comisión. Durante la sesión de la Comisión Africana, las partes son libres de hacer presentaciones orales o escritas. Algunos Estados envían representantes a las sesiones de la Comisión Africana para refutar las acusaciones realizadas en su contra. Las ONG y las personas individuales tienen garantizada audiencia también para realizar exposiciones orales. Sin embargo, no existe ninguna obligación de realizar presentaciones orales o de estar presente en la sesión; es suficiente con las presentaciones escritas.

Finalmente, la Comisión Africana decide si ha existido violación de la Carta Africana o no. Si encuentra que ha existido violación de la Carta hará recomendaciones al Estado en cuestión.

Si se halla una violación, las recomendaciones de la Comisión Africana incluirán las acciones requeridas al Estado para remediar la situación.

El mandato de la Comisión Africana es cuasi judicial y en virtud de ello, sus recomendaciones finales no son legalmente vinculantes por sí mismas para el Estado implicado.

Estas recomendaciones se incluyen en los Informes de Actividad Anual de los Comisionados, que se presenta a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno, en conformidad con el artículo 54 de la Carta. Si son aprobadas, se convierten en vinculantes para los Estados partes y son publicadas.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Hasta donde saben las personas autoras de esta guía, este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta ahora en un caso de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar.

Por ello es altamente recomendable ponerse en contacto con las personas autoras si queremos iniciar un proceso de establecimiento de estándares con la Comisión Africana.

Datos de contacto: 
African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights 31 Bijilo Annex Layout, Kombo North District Western Region P.O. Box 673 Banjul The Gambia Tel: +220-441 05 05, 441 05 06 Fax: +220-441 05 04 E-mail: : au-banjul@africa-union.org Sitio web: http://www.achpr.org/
Lecturas complementarias: 
Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño: procedimiento de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados

Resumen

El mandato del Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño (ACERWC) emana de los artículos 32 a 46 de la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño (ACRWC). Fue fundado en julio de 2001. Parte del mandato del ACERWC es vigilar la puesta en práctica de la ACRWC. Para ello, el ACERWC recibe y examina los informes presentados por los Estados parte sobre las medidas que han tomado para poner en práctica las disposiciones de la Carta, así como el progreso logrado en el ejercicio de los derechos reconocidos (artículo 43). Los informes iniciales de los Estados se supone que deben presentarse antes de dos años tras la entrada en vigor de la ACRWC, y los informes periódicos, cada tres años posteriormente. Se puede consultar la situación de los informes estatales en el sitio web del ACERWC en http://acerwc.org/state-reports/.

Los plazos de entrega de los informes iniciales se pueden consultar en http://www.africa-union.org/child/Due%20date%20of%20Submission%20of%20Re....

El ACERWC estudia el informe presentado por el Estado en sesiones plenarias, basándose en información incluida en los informes y otra información aportada por las ONG. Tras el examen del informe, el Comité de Expertos elabora Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales, que deben ser llevadas a la práctica por el Estado parte. Las Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales se incluyen también en el informe del ACERWC a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA.

Hasta ahora, el Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño no ha tratado la objeción de servicio militar. La cuestión del reclutamiento de menores sólo ha sido tratada brevemente durante el examen del informe de Uganda.

1. 1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Durante el estudio de los informes de los Estados, el Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño utiliza también información aportada por otras agencias de la UA y por ONG, y puede plantear cuestiones basándose en informaciones recibidas de las ONG. El ACERWC puede entonces incluir el asunto en sus Observaciones Finales y hacer recomendaciones al Estado en cuestión. Las Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales se transmiten al Estado en cuestión y forman parte del informe del Comité de Expertos a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

El mecanismo es aplicable a aquellos Estados que hayan ratificado la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño. Puede encontrarse una tabla con las ratificaciones de la ACRWC hasta el momento en http://acerwc.org/ratifications/.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Según el artículo 69 del Reglamento del ACERWC, “el Comité puede invitar a las... ONG y organizaciones de la sociedad civil, de conformidad con el artículo 42 de la Carta del Niño, para que presenten sus informes sobre la puesta en práctica de la Carta del Niño y para que proporcionen asesoramiento en las áreas que entran en el ámbito de su actividad.”

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Una vez que el Estado parte presenta su informe al ACERWC, el informe es un documento público y puede consultarse en el sitio web del ACERWC en http://acerwc.org/state-reports/. Es importante que las ONG presenten informes, ya sea un informe conjunto, o un informe de una única ONG destacando cuestiones concretas no mucho después de la publicación del informe estatal, pero en todo caso antes del Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones que estudiará el informe del Estado.

5. Consejos especiales para presentar información a este mecanismo

Hasta el momento, el ACERWC no ha publicado directrices para los informes presentados por las ONG. Sin embargo, el Comité de Expertos sí que ha elaborado unas directrices y temas principales para los informes de los Estados, y es útil estructurar los informes de las ONG alrededor de los mismos temas (o algunos de ellos). Los temas son:

  • Medidas generales para implementar la ACRWC
  • Definición de Niño
  • Principios generales
  • Derechos y libertades civiles
  • Entorno familiar y cuidados alternativos
  • Salud y bienestar
  • Educación, ocio y actividades culturales
  • Medidas de protección especiales
  • Responsabilidades del Niño.

Según la ACRWC, pueden plantearse temas de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar y la discriminación relacionada, y también de reclutamiento, sobre todo en relación a los artículos 9 (Libertad de Pensamiento, Conciencia y Religión), 11 (Educación) y 22 (Conflictos armados) de la Carta. El artículo 22 de la ACRWC declara que los Estados “se abstendrán de reclutar a ningún niño”.

Puede ser útil redactar preguntas sugiriendo que sean formuladas por el Comité de Expertos, organizadas por temas y disposiciones relevantes de la Carta, e incluirlas en el informe de la ONG.

Participación en el Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones

Aunque el Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones se reúne a puerta cerrada, el Comité de Expertos puede invitar a representantes de las ONG con estatus de observador al ACERWC a participar en él. Por ello es importante explicitar en la carta de presentación, cuando se presenta el informe de la ONG, que deseamos participar en el Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones. Sin embargo, no se puede garantizar que vaya a ser así. También es posible hacer presión a los miembros del Comité de Expertos informalmente fuera de las reuniones ordinarias del Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones.

Hacer presión antes y durante el periodo de sesiones

Es recomendable no limitarse a presentar un informe, sino también involucrarse con el Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño antes, durante y después del examen del informe del Estado. Después de la recepción del informe, el Comité de Expertos nombra un Relator entre sus miembros, y puede ser útil trabajar con el Relator responsable del informe de nuestro Estado, que estudiará el informe y la información presentada por las ONG, y elaborará una lista de cuestiones.

Las ONG con estatus de observador pueden asistir a la reunión pública del Comité de Expertos, pero no tienen permitido tomar la palabra.

6. Qué ocurre con el informe presentado (cuánto tardará)

Cuando el ACERWC recibe el informe presentado por el Estado, lo publica en su sitio web en http://acerwc.org/state-reports/.

El Comité de Expertos también designa un Relator de entre sus miembros, que es responsable del examen del informe del Estado y otra información recibida, incluida la información presentada por las ONG. El Relator elabora una lista de cuestiones para el debate en el Grupo de Trabajo previo al periodo de sesiones, que decidirá sobre la lista de cuestiones.

El examen del informe del Estado tiene lugar durante una sesión pública del Comité de Expertos en forma de diálogo con representantes del Estado en cuestión. Las ONG con estatus de observador pueden asistir a la sesión, pero no tienen permitido tomar la palabra. Tras el diálogo, el Comité de Expertos se reúne a puerta cerrada para elaborar sus Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales.
Las Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales se transmiten al Estado en cuestión, y se incluyen en el informe del Comité de Expertos a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA. También se publican en el sitio web del ACERWC.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta ahora para la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Las cuestiones de reclutamiento de menores han sido planteadas sistemáticamente por el ACERWC, aunque se plantearon durante el examen del informe de Uganda, y en las Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales sobre Uganda.

Datos de contacto: 
The African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child Commission of the African Union African Union Headquarters Social Affairs Department P.O. Box 3243 W21 K19 Addis Ababa Ethiopia Tel. +251-1-551 35 22 Fax +251-1-553 57 16 Email cissem@africa-union.org Sitio web: http://acerwc.org/
Lecturas complementarias: 
Observaciones y Recomendaciones Finales

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño: procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones

Resumen

Según el artículo 44 de la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, se considera comunicación toda correspondencia o denuncia procedente de un Estado, una persona individual o una ONG que denuncie actos perjudiciales para los derechos de los niños y niñas. Sin embargo, hasta 2011 el ACERWC solamente había recibido dos comunicaciones, y solamente había decidido respecto a una de ellas.

Las comunicaciones pueden ser presentadas por personas individuales, incluidos los niños que han sido víctimas de una violación de derechos humanos, sus progenitores o representantes legales, testigos, grupos de personas, ONG reconocida por la UA o cualquier institución del sistema de derechos humanos de la ONU. Una comunicación solamente puede presentarse después de que se han agotado los recursos legales domésticos, y si el mismo tema no ha sido abordado por otra investigación, procedimiento o regulación internacional. Como medida urgente, el Comité de Expertos puede solicitar al Estado parte implicado que tome medidas provisionales necesarias para evitar cualquier otro daño al niño o niños que podrían ser víctimas de violaciones de la Carta.

Después de investigar una denuncia, el Comité de Expertos hace una recomendación al Estado o Estados en cuestión para garantizar que se toman medidas para evitar que vuelvan a ocurrir violaciones de la Carta.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Tras la presentación de una comunicación, el Comité de Expertos toma una decisión en primer lugar sobre si se admite a trámite. Si se admite a trámite una denuncia, el Comité de Expertos investiga la denuncia, toma una decisión sobre el fondo del caso y hace recomendaciones al Estado implicado. Esto puede incluir compensaciones a las víctimas de violaciones de la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, y medidas para evitar que vuelvan a ocurrir.
Para evitar daños irreparables a la víctima o víctimas de supuestas violaciones de la ACRWC con la urgencia que exija la situación, el Comité de Expertos puede exigir al Estado en cuestión que adopte medidas provisionales cuando aún no se ha tomado una decisión sobre el fondo del caso, una vez que la denuncia haya sido admitida a trámite.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable este mecanismo

El mecanismo se aplica a aquellos Estados que hayan ratificado a Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, y no hayan formulado reservas al artículo 44. En el momento de escribir esta líneas, Egipto es el único Estado parte de la ACRWC que no se considera vinculado al artículo 44. Puede consultarse la tabla de ratificaciones de la ACRWC en http://acerwc.org/ratifications/.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Las comunicaciones pueden presentarlas personas individuales, incluidos los niños que han sido víctimas de una violación de derechos humanos, sus progenitores o representantes legales, testigos, grupos de personas, ONG reconocida por la UA, un Estado miembro de la UA, o cualquier institución del sistema de derechos humanos de la ONU.
También puede presentar comunicaciones un Estado parte de la ACRWC, y por un Estado que no sea parte de la ACRWC, atendiendo al interés superior del niño.
Las directrices para el estudio de las comunicaciones no mencionan la anonimidad del denunciante, pero es probable que sean de aplicación reglas similares para las comunicaciones como las de la Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Las comunicaciones deben presentarse al Comité de Expertos sobre los Derechos y Bienestar del Niño dentro de un plazo razonable desde el momento en que se han agotado las vías legales locales. Tras agotar las vías legales, o cuando el denunciante entiende que tales vías se prolongan exageradamente, puede presentar la denuncia al Comité de Expertos inmediatamente.
La ACRWC no da un plazo límite pero habla de tiempo razonable. Por ello es recomendable presentar la denuncia lo antes posible.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para la presentar la información

Cómo redactar una denuncia:

El procedimiento de presentación de comunicaciones de la Comisión Africana es sencillo y no exige contar con representación legal. La denuncia puede presentarla la víctima de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos o por otra personas actuando en su nombre, por cualquier grupo de personas, incluyendo las ONG reconocidas por la UA, por un Estado miembro de la UA, o por cualquier institución del sistema de derechos humanos de la ONU. Si nuestra ONG no cumple este criterio, es recomendable presentar la denuncia como grupo de personas.

Para que una denuncia sea admitida a trámite tiene que cumplir los siguientes requisitos:

  • El nombre, la nacionalidad y la firma de la personas o personas que la cumplimentan, o en el caso de las ONG, los nombres, las firmas de los representantes legales, y pruebas del estatus de la ONG;
  • si la persona denunciante desea que su identidad sea ocultada al Estado implicado y por qué;
  • una dirección postal, incluyendo a ser posible también un número de fax y/o correo electrónico;/li>
  • una descripción detallada de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos, especificando la fecha, lugar y naturaleza de las supuestas violaciones;
  • el nombre del Estado que supuestamente ha violado la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño;
  • todos los pasos dados para agotar los recursos legales locales, o una explicación de por qué el agotamiento de esos recursos sería excesivamente largo o inefectivo;
  • una indicación de que la denuncia no ha sido enviada a otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos.

Es recomendable hacer referencia a las disposiciones de la Carta Africana que se supone han sido violadas, aunque esto no es estrictamente necesario. Las Directrices para la Consideración de Comunicaciones proporcionadas por el artículo 44 de la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño (http://acerwc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/ACERWC-Guidelines-on-Commun...) incluyen información útil.

Procedimientos de emergencia:

Según el artículo 2-IV de las Directrices, el Comité de Expertos “puede reenviar al Estado parte en cuestión la petición de que tome medidas provisionales que el Comité considera necesarias para evitar nuevos daños al niño o niños que podrían ser víctimas de violaciones”.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Una vez que la denuncia ha sido recibida en la Secretaría del Comité Africano de Expertos sobre los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño, la Secretaría la registra y hace un resumen que se envia a todos los miembros del Comité de Expertos.
Antes de cada sesión, un Grupo de Trabajo del Comité de Expertos estudia la admisión a trámite de la denuncia. El Comité de Expertos decide entonces sobre la admisión a trámite durante una sesión ordinaria.
Cuando se admite a trámite una denuncia, la Secretaría lo comunica a los denunciantes. A continuación se envia también una comunicación al Estado o Estados en cuestión, con una petición para que haga comentarios por escrito sobre la comunicación en el plazo de tres meses.
Tras esto, el Comité de Expertos o el Grupo de Trabajo puede solicitar información adicional del Estado en cuestión o de los denunciantes.
El Comité de Expertos puede requerir la presencia de representantes del Estado implicado y/o los denunciantes para proporcionar aclaraciones adicionales en relación a la comunicación. Si se invita a una de las partes, la otra parte será también invitada a estar presente y hacer sus observaciones, si así lo desea. La reunión del Comité de Expertos durante la cual se examina la denuncia, tiene lugar a puerta cerrada.
Tras el examen de la denuncia, el Comité de Expertos toma una decisión sobre el fondo del caso, ya sea resolviendo que la ACRWC no ha sido violada, o hallando que ha existido una violación de la Carta, y haciendo recomendaciones al Estado implicado. Estas recomendaciones pueden ir desde la compensación a las víctimas de las violaciones de la Carta Africana de los Derechos y el Bienestar del Niño hasta a medidas para prevenir que vuelvan a ocurrir.
Uno de los miembros del Comité de Expertos será designado para supervisar la decisión, e informará regularmente al Comité de Expertos.
Las decisiones del Comité de Expertos se presentan entonces a la Asamblea de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de la UA, y se publican tras ser estudiadas por la Asamblea.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta ahora ni para casos de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, ni para cuestiones relacionadas con el reclutamiento de menores.

Datos de contacto: 
The African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child Commission of the African Union African Union Headquarters Social Affairs Department P.O. Box 3243 W21 K19 Addis Ababa Ethiopia Tel. +251-1-551 35 22 Fax +251-1-553 57 16 Email cissem@africa-union.org Sitio web: http://acerwc.org/
Lecturas complementarias: 
Precedentes (jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad ECOWAS

Resumen

Según el Protocolo Suplementario de 19 de enero de 2005, “el Tribunal tiene competencias para instruir casos de violaciones de derechos humanos que ocurren en cualquier Estado miembro.” No se exige el haber agotado las vías legales locales, es decir, que las personas individuales no tienen que seguir los recursos judiciales nacionales antes de presentar la denuncia al Tribunal de Justicia de ECOWAS. En lugar de esto, los principales requisitos son que la solicitud no sea anónima y que el asunto no esté pendiente de sentencia en otro tribunal internacional.

Un caso puede ser plantearse por cualquier persona dentro de la jurisdicción de un Estado miembro de la Comunidad Económica de los Estados de África Occidental (ECOWAS). Sin embargo, según el artículo 12 del Protocolo que establece el Tribunal de Justicia, es necesario contar con abogado u otro tipo de representación legal.

El marco de referencia del Tribunal de justicia de la Comunidad es la Carta Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos (ACHPR), así como otros instrumentos universales para la protección de los derechos humanos aprobados por las Naciones Unidas.

Los procedimientos ante el tribunal se componen de procedimientos orales y escritos, tras los cuales el Tribunal dictará sentencia en sesión pública. Las sentencias del Tribunal son vinculantes para cada Estado miembro, institución de ECOWAS o individuos.

Puede consultarse más información en el sitio web del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad en http://www.courtecowas.org/.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Después de presentar una denuncia al Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad, el Tribunal designa un Juez-Relator que prepara el caso para el Tribunal y hace recomendaciones respecto a qué investigaciones podrían hacer falta, la cuales podrían incluir documentos adicionales, testimonio orales, informes periciales o visitas sobre el terreno. Tras la finalización de las diligencias de prueba, el Tribunal fija una fecha para el juicio oral, que puede incluir declaraciones de testigos. Esta sesión es pública.

Cuando acaba el juicio oral, el Tribunal deliberar sobre la sentencia a puerta cerrada, y dicta sentencia en sesión pública.

Acción urgente:

Según el artículo 20 del Protocolo A/P.l/7/91 del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad, “el Tribunal, cada vez que se le presenta un caso, puede ordenar cualquier medida provisional o dictar cualquier instrucción provisional que considere necesaria o deseable.

Cuando se plantea un caso ante el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad, también es posible -en documento aparte- presentar una solicitud de medidas provisionales. Dicha solicitud debería ser remitida al Tribunal por el Presidente en un plazo máximo de 48 horas tras su interposición.

Los artículos 79 al 86 del Reglamento tratan con mayor detalle esta cuestión.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

El mecanismo se aplica a aquellos Estados miembros de la Comunidad Económica de los Estados de África Occidental (ECOWAS). Puede consultarse la lista de Estado miembros en http://ecowas.int/.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Según el artículo 10 del Protocolo A/SP. 1/01/05, las personas individuales sujetas a la jurisdicción de un Estado miembro pueden solicitar al Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad reparación ante una violación de sus derechos humanos.

Sin embargo, según el artículo 12 del Protocolo que establece el Tribunal de Justicia, es necesaria representación legal por un abogado.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Las denuncias deben presentarse lo antes posible al Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad, aunque ni el Protocolo que establece el Tribunal ni el Reglamento dan plazos límite en casos de violaciones de derechos humanos. No hace falta agotar las instancias legales nacionales. De hecho, el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad declaró que no es un Tribunal de apelación, así que los casos deberían presentarse directamente al Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

El Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad es un tribunal competente, y de acuerdo al artículo 12 del Protocolo que lo establece, es necesario contar con representación legal. Cualquier abogado que represente a una víctima de violaciones de derechos humanos debe estar autorizado para ejercer ante un tribunal de un país miembro de ECOWAS.

Cómo interponer una denuncia ante el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad:

Como la representación legal por parte de un abogado o agente es obligatoria para presentar una denuncia, lo que sigue es sólo un breve resumen que debería ayudar a tomar una decisión sobre si interponer una denuncia.

Aunque los idiomas oficiales del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad son el inglés, el francés y el portugués, la denuncias contra los Estados miembros tienen que presentarse en uno de los idiomas de ese Estado. Los artículos 32 a 40 del Reglamento hacen referencia al procedimiento escrito ante el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad.

Las denuncias ante el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad tienen que incluir:

  • nombre y dirección del denunciante;
  • la parte contra la que se presenta la denuncia (los “demandados”), que en el caso de violaciones de derechos humanos, puede ser un Estado;
  • el tema en cuestión, una clara descripción de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos, y qué disposiciones de la ACHPR se supone que han sido violadas;/li>
  • qué tipo de resolución judicial quiere el denunciante que tome el Tribunal
  • si procede, la proposición de pruebas en apoyo de la denuncia.

Las denuncias presentadas ante el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad tienen que estar por escrito y firmadas por el agente o abogado del denunciante, con cinco copias certificadas para el Tribunal más una copia para cada parte en el caso.

Procedimientos de emergencia:

El artículo 20 del Protocolo A/P.1/7/91 del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad establece que el Tribunal puede “ordenar medidas transitorias o dictar las resoluciones provisionales que considere necesarias o deseables”, estableciendo así un procedimiento de emergencia. Los artículos 79 al 86 del Reglamento tratan los procedimientos provisionales con mayor detalle.
Las solicitudes de medidas provisionales o resoluciones provisionales deben hacerse en un documento aparte al mismo tiempo que la denuncia, y deben explicar por qué son necesarias con urgencia las medidas transitorias o resoluciones provisionales. La solicitud debe incluir también qué medidas o resoluciones debe dictar el Tribunal.

Tras presentar la solicitud, el Presidente debe remitirla a la Corte en 48 horas como máximo. El demandado tendrá también un pequeño periodo de tiempo para responder a la solicitud.

El Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad decide entonces si dicta medidas transitorias o resoluciones provisionales y emite la orden judicial correspondiente.

6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

El Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad se ocupa de los casos en el orden en el que son registrados. Tras la presentación de un escrito de denuncia, éste es remitido al demandado, que tiene entonces un mes para responder.

Sin embargo, este límite de tiempo puede extenderse si así se solicita.

A continuación, se le da al denunciante un mes para responder a la defensa, que a su vez tiene entonces otro mes para responder al denunciante.

El caso está a cargo de un Juez-Relator, que elabora un informe preliminar que de incluir recomendaciones sobre si es necesaria la práctica de pruebas u previa u otros pasos previos. Estas recomendaciones pueden incluir el encargo de un informe pericial.

Basándose en el informe del Juez-Relator, el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad decide qué pruebas practica, entre las que pueden estar:

  • tla toma de declaración de las partes;
  • petición de información y documentación adicional;
  • testimonio oral;
  • solicitud de un informe pericial;
  • inspección del lugar o de las evidencias.

Tras la práctica de las pruebas, el Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad fija la fecha para la vista del juicio oral, que puede incluir declaraciones orales de testigos en sesión pública del Tribunal.

Tras examinar las pruebas y escuchar las presentaciones de las partes, el Tribunal delibera el fallo a puerta cerrada. La sentencia se dicta en sesión pública, y es vinculante desde esa fecha.

Es probable que el proceso tarde más de dos años en total.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta ahora para la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar.

Datos de contacto: 
Community Court of Justice – ECOWAS 10 Dar Es Salaam Crescent, Off Aminu Kano Crescent, Wuse II, Abuja, Nigeria. Tel: +234-9-5240781 Fax: +234-9-6708210 Email : information@courtecowas.org o info@courtecowas.org or president@courtecowas.org Sitio web: http://courtecowas.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
  • Community Court of Justice: Protocol A/P.l/7/91 on the Community Court of Justice, 6 de julio de 1991, http://www.courtecowas.org/site2012/pdf_files/protocol.pdf, consultado el 22 de deciembre de 2012
  • Community Court of Justice: Supplementary Protocol A/SP.1/01/05 amending the Preamble and Articles 1, 2, 9 and 30 of Protocol A/P.1/7/91 Relating to the Community Court of Justice and Article 4 paragraph 1 of the English version of the said Protocol, 19 de enero de 2005, http://www.courtecowas.org/site2012/pdf_files/supplementary_protocol.pdf, consultado el 22 diciembre de 2012
  • Community Court of Justice: Rules of Procedure, agosto de 2003, http://www.courtecowas.org/site2012/pdf_files/rules_of_procedure.pdf, consultado el 22 de diciembre de 2012
  • H.N. Donli – Ex Presidente/Juez: The Law, Practice, and Procedure of the Community Court of Justice – Meaning and Implication. Artículo presentado por el Presidente del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad, ECOWAS Su Señoría, Juez H.N. Donli, en el Seminario sobre Ley, Práctica y Procedimiento del Tribunal de Justicia de la Comunidad – ECOWAS, organizado por el Foro de Derechos Humanos de África Occidental, 7-9 de diciembre de 2006, Bamako, Mali, http://www.crin.org/docs/ECOWASmeaning.doc, consultado el 11 de octubre de 2012
  • Justice H.N. Donli – Past President/Judge: Human Rights: Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States. Artículo presentado en la conferencia de la International Society for the Reform of Criminal Law sobre “20 Años de Reforma del Código Penal: Antiguos logros y Retos futuros", Vancouver, 22-27 de junio de 2007, http://www.isrcl.org/Papers/2007/Donli.pdf, consultado 11 October 2012
  • Andrew W. Maki: ECOWAS Court and the Promise of the Local Remedies Rule, in: The Human Rights Brief, noviembre de 2009, http://hrbrief.org/2009/11/ecowas-court-and-the-promise-of-the-local-rem..., consultado el 11 de octubre de 2012
  • Jeneba Kamara: The Law and Practice of the ECOWAS Community Court of Justice, in: Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law, 26 de mayo de 2006, http://www.carl-sl.org/home/articles/132-the-law-and-practice-of-the-eco..., consultado el 11 de octubre de 2012
  • Adewale Banjo: The ECOWAS Court and the Politics of Access to Justice in West Africa, in: Africa Development, Vol. XXXII, No. 1, 2007, pp.69–87, http://www.ajol.info/index.php/ad/article/viewFile/57155/45547, consultado el 11 de octubre de 2012
  • M.T. Ladan: Access to justice as a Human Rights under the ECOWAS Community Law, A Paper presented at: The Commonwealth Regional Conference on the Theme: - The 21st Century Lawyer: Present Challenges and Future Skills, Abuja, Nigeria, 8–11 de abril de 2010, http://www.abu.edu.ng/publications/2009-07-12-135031_3901.docx, consultado el 11 de octubre 2012
  • Solomon T. Ebrobah: A critical analysis of the human rights mandate of the ECOWAS Community Court of Justice, Danish Institute for Human Rights, Research Partnership 1/2008, http://www.escr-net.org/usr_doc/S_Ebobrah.pdf, consultado el 11 de octubre de 2012
Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

The Americas

All States of the Americas are members of the Organization of American States. The Charter of the Organization of American States (see http://www.oas.org/dil/treaties_A-41_Charter_of_the_Organization_of_Amer...) establishes in article 106 the “Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, whose principal function shall be to promote the observance and protection of human rights and to serve as a consultative organ of the Organization in these matters.
The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) is the principal organ of the OAS in relation to human rights, carrying out thematic activities and initiatives, preparing reports on the human rights situation in a certain country or on a particular thematic issue, and processing and analysing individual petitions in cases of alleged human rights violations.
The legal framework of the IACHR is either the 1948 Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man (the American Declaration – see http://www.cidh.oas.org/Basicos/English/Basic2.american%20Declaration.htm), or the American Convention on Human Rights of 1969 (see http://www.cidh.oas.org/Basicos/English/Basic3.American%20Convention.htm), or other relevant inter-American human rights treaties.
The second relevant human rights related organ of the OAS is the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, established in 1979 (see http://www.corteidh.or.cr). It is not possible to bring a case directly to the Inter-American Court – only the Inter-American Commission can do so, and only for those States members of the OAS that have accepted the jurisdiction of the Court.
Part of the mandate of the IACHR is also to observe the general situation of human rights in the Member States and publish, when it deems appropriate, reports on the situation in a given Member State.

A much more recent regional instrument is the Ibero-American Convention on the Rights of Youth from 11 October 2005 (English: http://scout.org/content/download/22369/200853/file/IBEROAMERICAN%2520CO...). This convention, which applies to young people between 15 and 24 years, recognises in article 12 explicitly the right to conscientious objection to obligatory military service. Article 35 paragraph 4 also establishes that the national authorities competent for public youth policy shall submit to the Secretary-General of the Ibero-American Youth Organisation (http://www.oij.org) a biannual report on the progress made in achieving the observance of the provisions of the convention. However, there is no review procedure.

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos: panorama general

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/) (CIDH) fue creada por una resolución de la Quinta Reunión de Consulta de Ministros de Relaciones Exteriores de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA) en Santiago de Chile, en 1959, y empezó a trabajar en 1960. Se convirtió en uno de los principales órganos de la OEA con el Protocolo de Buenos Aires desde 1967, que modificó la Carta de la OEA. El Protocolo de Buenos Aires (ver http://www.oas.org/dil/esp/tratados_B-31_Protocolo_de_Buenos_Aires.htm) transformó la Comisión Interamericana en un órgano formal de la OEA y prescribió que la función principal de la Comisión sería “promover la observancia y protección de los derechos humanos” (artículo 53 y 106 de la Carta de la OEA -ver http://www.oas.org/dil/esp/tratados_A-41_Carta_de_la_Organizacion_de_los...).

La Comisión Interamericana se caracteriza por un “papel dual” único, que refleja su origen como órgano basado en la Carta y posterior transformación en órgano ligado a tratado cuando la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (CADH) entró en vigor. Como órgano de la Carta de la OEA, la Comisión Interamericana realiza funciones relacionadas con todos los Estados miembros de de la OEA (artículo 41 de la CADH), y como órgano de la Convención sus funciones son aplicables sólo a los Estados parte de la Convención Americana de Derechos Humanos (CADH).

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos tiene tres funciones principales:

  • supervisar e investigar la situación de los derechos humanos en América, incluida la producción de informes nacionales sobre la situación de los derechos humanos (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/informes/pais.asp) o informes temáticos (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/informes/tematicos.asp). Sin embargo, a diferencia de la ONU o el sistema africano de derechos humanos, no existe una elaboración periódica de informes por parte de los Estados;
  • tratar denuncias individuales de supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos. Esto puede implicar intentar encontrar una solución amistosa, o remitir un caso a la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos para aquellos países que han aceptado la jurisdicción del Tribunal;
  • relatorías temáticas o especiales, cuyo papel es la vigilancia y fortalecimiento de aspectos concretos de los derechos humanos. Las oficinas de los relatores “pueden funcionar como relatorías temáticas asignadas a un miembro de la Comisión, o como relatorías especiales, asignadas a otras personas designadas por la Comisión.” (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/mandato/relatorias.asp).

El papel dual de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos quiere decir que también tiene dos cartas de derechos humanos diferentes como referencia. Todos los Estados miembros de la OEA han firmado y ratificado la Declaración de los Derechos y Deberes del Hombre (la Declaración Americana – ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/mandato/Basicos/declaracion.asp) de 1948. El artículo III dela Declaración Americana protege la libertad de religión: “Toda persona tiene el derecho de profesar libremente una creencia religiosa y de manifestarla y practicarla en público y en privado.” A pesar de ello, no existe ninguna referencia a la libertad de conciencia en la Declaración Americana.

Para los países que han ratificado la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/mandato/Basicos/convencion.asp) de 1969. El artículo 12 de la Convención Americana protege la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión:

1. Toda persona tiene derecho a la libertad de conciencia y de religión. Este derecho implica la libertad de conservar su religión o sus creencias, o de cambiar de religión o de creencias, así como la libertad de profesar y divulgar su religión o sus creencias, individual o colectivamente, tanto en público como en privado.
2. Nadie puede ser objeto de medidas restrictivas que puedan menoscabar la libertad de conservar su religión o sus creencias o de cambiar de religión o de creencias.

Puede consultarse la lista de países que han ratificado la Convención Americana en http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/mandato/Basicos/convratif.asp

La Convención Americana establece también la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (ver http://www.corteidh.or.cr). Sin embargo, además de ratificar la Convención Americana, un Estado parte debe presentar voluntariamente la petición a la jurisdicción de la Corte Interamericana para que éste sea competente para ver una causa relacionada con ese Estado. Las peticiones solamente pueden ser planteadas por un Estado parte o por la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos.

Algunas Relatorías de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos también pueden ser útiles en los casos de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar, o para plantear cuestiones acerca de la violación de los derechos humanos de quienes hacen campaña por el derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Estas Relatorías son:

Datos de contacto: 
Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos Organización de los Estados Americanos 1889 F St NW Washington, D.C., 20006 United States of America Tel.: +1-202-458 6002 Fax: +1-202-458 3992 / +1-202-458 3650 / +1-202-458 6215 E-mail: cidhdenuncias@oas.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos: procedimiento de presentación de peticiones

Resumen

Según el artículo 23 del Reglamento de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, “cualquier persona o grupo de personas, o entidad no gubernamental legalmente reconocida en uno o más Estados miembros de la OEA puede presentar a la Comisión peticiones en su propio nombre o en el de terceras personas, referentes a la presunta violación de alguno de los derechos humanos reconocidos, según el caso, en la Declaración Americana de los Derechos y Deberes del Hombre, la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos”.

Una petición solamente puede ser presentada después de que se hayan agotado las vías legales nacional, y debe presentarse dentro de un plazo de 6 meses después de la sentencia firme. Además, el tema de la petición o comunicación no puede estar pendiente de juicio en otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos.

Para los Estados miembros de la OEA que hayan ratificado la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos, esta será la referencia legal para evaluar una petición. Para los que no lo hayan hecho, será la Declaración de los Derechos y Deberes del Hombre de 1948 (la Declaración Americana). Además, cualquier otro protocolo interamericano de derechos humanos ratificado por el Estado puede formar la base de una petición.

Cuando se ha admitido a trámite una petición, la Comisión Interamericana procede a analizar en detalle las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos. También puede intentar llegar a una “solución amistosa” entre las partes implicadas. Si la Comisión Interamericana halla una violación de derechos protegidos por el tratado de derechos humanos aplicable, publicará un informe sobre el fondo del caso que incluirá recomendaciones al Estado con el objetivo de terminar con las violaciones de derechos humanos, implementar reparaciones y/o realizar cambios en la ley.

Si un Estado no cumple las recomendaciones de la Comisión Interamericana, la Comisión puede decidir hacer público el caso o remitirlo a la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, si está implicado un Estado parte que ha aceptado la competencia de la Corte.

1. Resultados probables del uso de este mecanismo

Tras la presentación de una petición ante la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, la Comisión decidirá en primer lugar si admitir a trámite la petición. Si se admite a trámite la petición, la Comisión Interamericana puede intentar negociar una solución amistosa entre las partes implicadas, o -si la negociación no tiene éxito o las partes no quieren- proceder a tomar una decisión sobre el fondo del caso.

Si la Comisión Interamericana halla una violación de los derechos humanos protegidos según el tratado de derechos humanos aplicable, publicará un informe sobre el fondo que incluirá recomendaciones al Estado dirigidas a acabar con las violaciones de los derechos humanos, implementar reparaciones y/o realizar cambios en la ley. Este informe será trasmitido al Estado en cuestión. Si el Estado no cumple las recomendaciones de la Comisión Interamericana en un plazo de 3 meses, la Comisión remitirá el caso a la Corte Interamericana (si concierne a un Estado parte que ha aceptado la competencia del Tribunal, de acuerdo con el artículo 62 de la Convención Americana), o publicará un informe definitivo con conclusiones y observaciones finales.

Acción urgente:

Según el artículo 25 del Reglamento: “en situaciones de gravedad y urgencia la Comisión podrá, a iniciativa propia o a solicitud de parte, solicitar que un Estado adopte medidas cautelares para prevenir daños irreparables a las personas o al objeto del proceso en conexión con una petición o caso pendiente.

2. A qué Estado es aplicable el mecanismo

El mecanismo es aplicable a todos los Estados miembros de la Organización de los Estados Americanos (OEA), aunque con variaciones. Aunque la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos tratará las peticiones relacionadas con violaciones de derechos humanos de todos los Estados miembros de la OEA, el procedimiento y el marco legal depende de qué tratados interamericanos ha ratificado el Estado.

Puede consultarse una lista de Estados miembros de la OEA en http://www.oas.org/es/estados_miembros/default.asp.

3. Quién puede presentar información

De acuerdo al artículo 44 de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos, “cualquier persona o grupo de personas, o entidad no gubernamental legalmente reconocida en uno o más Estados miembros de la Organización, puede presentar a la Comisión peticiones que contengan denuncias o quejas de violación de esta Convención por un Estado parte”.

No es necesario abogado, pero es posible estar representado por uno.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Solamente puede presentarse una petición una vez se han agotado las instancias legales nacionales. Las peticiones deben presentarse dentro de un plazo de 6 meses tras la sentencia firme. Además, el tema de la petición o comunicación no deberá estar pendiente de resolución en otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la petición

Aunque el procedimiento de petición de la Comisión Interamericana es sencillo y no requiere representación legal, es recomendable leer el folleto informativo de la Comisión sobre el “Sistema de Peticiones y Casos”, que incluye también un formulario que puede ser útil para presentar un caso (ver http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/docs/folleto/CIDHFolleto_esp.pdf).

Las peticiones pueden ser presentadas por cualquier persona o grupo de personas, o por cualquier ONG con entidad legal en uno o más Estados miembros de la OEA.

Cómo escribir una petición:

Para que una petición sea admitida a trámite, tiene que cumplir los siguientes requisitos:

  • debe incluir los nombres, nacionalidades y firmas de las personas que presentan la petición. Si la presenta una ONG, el nombre y la firma de sus representantes legales;
  • debe indicar si la persona que presenta la petición desea que se oculte su identidad al Estado en cuestión;
  • una dirección donde recibir las comunicaciones de la Comisión Interamericana, incluyendo si es posible un número de teléfono, fax y correo electrónico;
  • una descripción detallada de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos, especificando fecha, lugar, y naturaleza de las supuestas violaciones;
  • si es posible, los nombres de las víctimas y de las autoridades públicas implicadas en la supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos;
  • el Estado responsable de las supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos;
  • todos los pasos que se han dado para agotar los recursos legales locales;
  • la indicación de que la petición no se ha presentado a ningún otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos.

Además, la petición tiene que presentarse dentro de un plazo de 6 meses después de que se hayan agotados los recursos de la jurisdicción interna. Si por algún motivo estos no pueden agotarse, porque se prolongan injustificadamente o son inefectivos, esto debería manifestarse en la petición.

Procedimientos de emergencia:

De acuerdo al artículo 25 del Reglamento, “en situaciones de gravedad y urgencia la Comisión podrá, a iniciativa propia o a solicitud de parte, solicitar que un Estado adopte medidas cautelares para prevenir daños irreparables a las personas o al objeto del proceso en conexión con una petición o caso pendiente.
La solicitud de medidas cautelares debe hacerse cuando se presente la petición, o -si la situación lo requiere después de presentada la petición- cuando sea necesario.

6. Qué ocurre con la petición (cuánto tardará)

A la recepción de la petición por parte de la Secretaría de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, la Secretaría se encarga del procesamiento inicial de la petición, especialmente de comprobar si cumple los requisitos del artículo 28 del Reglamento. Si la documentación está incompleta, la Secretaría se pondrá en contracto con la persona o la ONG que presentó la petición y solicitará información adicional.

La Secretaría también registra la petición y acusa recibo.

Cuando se cumplan todos los requisitos, la Secretaría notifica inmediatamente a la Comisión Interamericana.

Durante el procedimiento de admisión a trámite, las partes relevantes de la petición se reenvían al Estado en cuestión para que realice comentarios. Si la persona que presenta la petición quiere que se mantenga oculta su identidad, ésta no se transmite al Estado. Sin embargo, en el caso de las víctimas de supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos, normalmente no es posible mantener ocultas sus identidades.

Según el artículo 30 del Reglamento, el Estado debe responder en un máximo de dos meses desde el envío de la solicitud de la Secretaría. Este plazo puede prorrogarse pero no excederá los 3 meses contados desde la fecha de la solicitud inicial.

En situaciones de gravedad y urgencia, o cuando esté en peligro real o inminente la vida o la integridad física de la supuesta victima, la Comisión pedirá al Estado una respuesta inmediata.
Antes de la decisión sobre la admisión a trámite, la Comisión Interamericana puede solicitar información adicional a las partes implicadas.

Antes de la sesión ordinaria de la Comisión Interamericana, se reúne un Grupo de Trabajo sobre admisibilidad para hacer recomendaciones respecto a la admisión a trámite de las peticiones. Después la Comisión toma una decisión a este respecto. Todas las decisiones sobre la admisión a trámite son públicas y se incluyen en el Informe anual de la Comisión Interamericana. Los informes sobre admisibilidad se pueden encontrar en http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/decisiones/casos.asp.

Después de decidir sobre la admisión a trámite, la Comisión Interamericana procede a adoptar una resolución sobre el fondo del caso. En primer lugar, los peticionarios tienen dos meses para presentar información adicional a la Comisión Interamericana. Las partes relevantes de esta información se transmiten al Estado en cuestión, que tiene a su vez otros dos meses para contestar.
Antes de la decisión sobre el fondo del caso, la Comisión Interamericana fija un periodo de tiempo para que las partes expresen si están interesadas en iniciar un procedimiento de acuerdo amistoso, de acuerdo con el artículo 41 del Reglamento.

Si lo considera necesario, la Comisión Interamericana puede también convocar una audiencia con las partes. También puede llevar a cabo una investigación sobre el terreno (artículo 40 del Reglamento).

Finalmente, la Comisión Interamericana delibera a puerta cerrada para tomar una decisión sobre el fondo del caso. Si la Comisión Interamericana llega a la conclusión de que no ha existido violación del tratado de derechos humanos aplicable, el informe recogerá esto y será publicado con el Informe Anual de la Comisión Interamericana.

Si la Comisión Interamericana halla una violación de los derechos humanos, elaborará un informe preliminar que incluya recomendaciones al Estado implicado, que será presentado a éste con un plazo para que informe de las medidas tomadas para cumplir las recomendaciones. En ese momento, el informe no ha sido publicado aun, y el Estado implicado tampoco está autorizado a publicarlo.
Si en plazo de tres meses después de la transmisión del informe preliminar al Estado implicado todavía no se ha resuelto el asunto, la Comisión Interamericana puede dictar un informe definitivo que incluya la opinión de la Comisión, y conclusiones y recomendaciones definitivas. El informe final es de nuevo transmitido a las partes implicadas, con una fecha límite para presentar información en cumplimiento de las recomendaciones.

Cuando expire el plazo, la Comisión Interamericana decidirá si publica el informe definitivo, y si lo incluye en el Informe Anual de la Comisión. Pueden consultarse los informes definitivos publicados en http://www.oas.org/es/cidh/decisiones/fondos.asp#inicio.

El procedimiento descrito es aplicable a todos los Estados de la Organización de los Estados Americanos, hayan ratificado o no la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos, y hayan aceptado o no la competencia de la Corte Interamericana. Sin embargo, la referencia jurídica puede ser diferente, si el Estado es parte de la Convención Americana o no. No debemos olvidar esto cuando presentamos una petición.

Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos

Lo que viene a continuación solamente es aplicable a los Estados partes de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos que han aceptado la competencia de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, de acuerdo al artículo 62 de la Convención.

Después de la aprobación de un informe preliminar sobre el fondo del caso por parte del Comisión Interamericana, se le notifica la decisión al peticionario original, que tendrá un mes para presentar su postura sobre si el caso debe ser presentado a la Corte Interamericana.

Tanto la Comisión Interamericana como el Estado en cuestión pueden presentar demandas ante la Corte Interamericana. Puede consultarse el Reglamento de la Corte en http://www.corteidh.or.cr/reglamento.cfm. Desde el punto de vista de la persona peticionaria, es probable que el caso sea llevado por la Comisión Interamericana.

Los casos vistos por la Corte Interamericana finalizan normalmente con una sentencia que puede incluir una orden de pago de reparaciones a las víctimas de violaciones de derechos humanos. Las sentencias de la Corte Interamericano pueden consultarse en http://www.corteidh.or.cr/porpais.cfm.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

El sistema de derechos humanos interamericano ha sido usado en casos de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar con resultados diversos. El primer caso de objeción de conciencia presentado a la Comisión Interamericana fue el del objetor colombiano Luís Gabriel Caldas León en 1995. Este caso fue finalmente archivado en 2010 sin se que hubiera alcanzado una decisión definitiva (ver www.cidh.oas.org/annualrep/2010sp/125.COAR11596ES.doc).

En 1999, un grupo de objetores de conciencia chilenos presentó una petición ante la Comisión Interamericana denunciando una violación de su derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión. En su opinión, la Comisión Interamericana rechazó que existiera un derecho a la objeción de conciencia establecido en la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos (ver Informe nº 43/05, http://wri-irg.org/node/10699). En 2004, El Defensor del Pueblo de Bolivia planteó un caso relativo a un objetor de conciencia boliviano. El caso acabó en 2005 con una solución amistosa (ver , Informe nº 97/05).

Desde la decisión negativa de 2005 en el caso de Chile, el Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas y el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos han hecho avances en la interpretación de artículos equivalentes del Pacto Internacional de Derechos Civiles y Políticos y la Convención Europea sobre Derechos Humanos respectivamente, así que es posible que la Comisión Interamericana pueda cambiar también su interpretación de la Convención Americana si se encuentra con un buen caso. Sin embargo, se recomienda a cualquiera que piense desarrollar una labor de este tipo que se ponga en contacto con las personas autoras de esta publicación.

Hasta ahora, no se ha presentado ningún caso de objeción de conciencia a la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos.

Datos de contacto: 
Inter-American Commission on Human Rights 1889 F St. NW Washington, DC, 20006 United States E-mail: cidhdenuncias@oas.org Formulario electrónico: https://www.cidh.oas.org/cidh_apps/instructions.asp?gc_language=S Fax: +1-202-458-3992 ó 6215 Fax: +1-202-458-3992 or 6215
Lecturas complementarias: 
Informes

None

A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes

Resumen

La Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes (ver http://www.laconvencion.org/index.php?descargas/index/cidj,pdf&PHPSESSID...) fue firmada en 2005 en la ciudad española de Badajoz, y entró en vigor el 1 de marzo de 2008. Se aplica a los Estados que la han ratificado, y está limitada a la región iberoamericana, que también incluye a España, Portugal y Andorra en Europa.
La Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes define “joven” como aquella persona de entre 15 y 24 años de edad.
La Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes reconoce explícitamente en su artículo 12 el derecho a la objeción de conciencia, y prohíbe el reclutamiento de menores de 18 años:
1. Los jóvenes tienen derecho a formular objeción de conciencia frente al servicio militar obligatorio.
2. Los Estados Parte se comprometen a promover las medidas legislativas pertinentes para garantizar el ejercicio de este derecho y avanzar en la eliminación progresiva del servicio militar obligatorio.
3. Los Estados Parte se comprometen a asegurar que los jóvenes menores de 18 años no serán llamados a filas ni involucrados, en modo alguno, en hostilidades militares.

Aunque actualmente no existe ningún mecanismo que supervise la Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes, los Estados que la han ratificado deben enviar un informe cada dos años a la Secretaría General de laOrganización Iberoamericana de la Juventud. El Secretario General de turno informa a la conferencia semestral de ministros iberoamericanos con responsabilidades en políticas de juventud.

1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

Puesto que no existe actualmente ningún mecanismo de supervisión en relación con la Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes, el mejor resultado posible es la inclusión de una violación de la Convención en el informe del Secretario General a la Organización Iberoamericana de la Juventud.

2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

El mecanismo es aplicable a los Estados que han ratificado la Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes. Puede consultarse una lista de países que han ratificado la Convención en http://www.laconvencion.org/index.php?secciones/mapa.

3. Quién puede presentar información

Cualquiera puede presentar información a Organización Iberoamericana de la Juventud.

4. Cuándo presentar la información

Como no hay mecanismo de supervisión, no existe indicaciones claras de cuándo es mejor presentar información. Sin embargo, hay dos oportunidades principales:

  • después de que un país haya presentado su informe semestral de acuerdo al artículo 35 de la Convención de la Juventud ”sobre el estado de aplicación de los compromisos contenidos en la presente Convención”. Esto puede contestarse con un informe por parte de una ONG que destaque las violaciones de la Convención. Los informes de los Estados pueden consultarse en http://www.laconvencion.org/index.php?secciones/estudios
  • de forma oportuna antes de la conferencia semestral de ministros iberoamericanos con responsabilidades en políticas de juventud.

5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

No existen reglamentos especiales. Cuando se presenta un informe contestando a un informe estatal, es recomendable hacer referencia a las secciones pertinentes del informe estatal.

6. Qué sucede con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

Al no haber un mecanismo claro, no existen indicaciones de qué puede pasar con la presentación.

7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

Este mecanismo no ha sido usado hasta el momento para casos de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar.

Datos de contacto: 
OIJ - Organización Iberoamericana de Juventud Paseo de Recoletos 8 - 1a Planta 28001 - Madrid (España) Tel +34-91-369 02 84/03 50 Fax +34-91-577 50 39 Email oij@oij.org Sitio web: http://www.oij.org
Lecturas complementarias: 
  • Convención Iberoamericana de Derechos de los Jóvenes, http://www.laconvencion.org/index.php?descargas/index/cidj,pdf&PHPSESSID...
  • Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)

    None

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Europe

    Europe has a range of European human rights systems, covering virtually all of the European continent, and even reaching beyond Europe.

    The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) grew out of the Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE). The Helsinki Final Act from 1975 defines “respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief” as one of the principles guiding the relations between participating States. Consequently, the OSCE monitors the human rights situation in its 56 participating States. The most relevant forum is the annual Human Dimension Implementation Meeting, organised by the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). In addition, the OSCE has a presence in some of its participating States.
    The reach of the OSCE goes well beyond Europe, and includes the USA and Canada, and most states of the former Soviet Union, well into central Asia.

    The Council of Europe was established in 1949. According to article 3 of its Statutes, every member State must accept the principle “of the enjoyment by all persons within its jurisdiction of human rights and fundamental freedoms”. The main human rights treaty of the Council of Europe is the European Convention on Human Rights.
    Within the Council of Europe, there are several institutions of interest to conscientious objectors to military service:

    • The Commissioner for Human Rights (http://www.coe.int/t/commissioner/default_en.asp) is an independent institution within the Council of Europe, mandated to promote awareness of and respect for human rights in Council of Europe member states. However, the Commissioner for Human Rights does not have a mandate to act on individual complaints, but the Commissioner can draw conclusions and take wider initiatives on the basis of reliable information regarding human rights violations suffered by individuals;
    • The European Court of Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int/ECHR/homepage_en) is the Council of Europe's highest human rights court, judging on complaints based on the European Convention on Human Rights;
    • The European Committee of Social Rights oversees the European Social Charter (http://www.coe.int/T/DGHL/Monitoring/SocialCharter/), both via a reporting procedure and via a complaint procedure;
    • The Committee of Ministers (http://www.coe.int/t/cm/home_en.asp) is the main decision-making organ of the Council of Europe, and is also tasked with overseeing the implementation of judgements of the European Court of Human Rights. The Committee of Ministers also decides on recommendations on human rights issues, including conscientious objection to military service;
    • The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (http://assembly.coe.int) consists of delegates from the Parliaments of member States. The Parliamentary Assembly passes resolutions relevant to human rights, and also has a Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights.

    The third relevant institution is the European Union (http://europa.eu/index_en.htm), which incorporated the European Charter of Fundamental Rights into primary European law when it adopted the Lisbon Treaty on 1 December 2009.
    The European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (http://fra.europa.eu/en – FRA) assists EU institutions and EU Member States in understanding and tackling challenges to safeguarding fundamental rights within the Member States of the European Union by collecting and analysing information from EU Member States.
    The European Parliament (http://www.europarl.europa.eu/portal/en) can be an important body for lobbying, as it passes resolutions on human rights issues, including the right to conscientious objection to military service. The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (http://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/libe/home.html) is in charge of human rights within the European Union, while the Subcommittee on Human Rights (http://www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/droi/home.html) deals with human rights world-wide.
    On the level of EU government – the European Commission – the European Union established a EU Special Representative (EUSR) for Human Rights.
    However, the European Union does not really have a mechanism to protect human rights within its member states. Lobbying of the European Parliament or the European Commission is outside the scope of this guide.

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa (OSCE): Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana

    Resumen

    La Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana (HDIM) es la conferencia principal de la Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa (OSCE) para hablar de la implementación de los llamados compromisos en materia de “dimensión humana” de los Estados miembros de la OSCE. El término “dimensión humana” describe el conjunto de normas y actividades relacionadas con los derechos humanos, y el imperio de la ley y la democracia, considerados dentro de la OSCE como uno de los pilares de su concepto de Seguridad y Cooperación en Europa. El documento fundacional de la OSCE, el Acta Final de Helsinki de 1975, define el “respeto de los derechos humanos y de las libertades fundamentales, incluida la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia, religión o creencia” como uno de los principios directrices de las relaciones entre los Estados participantes.
    Las ONG pueden participar totalmente en las Reuniones sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana en pie de igualdad con los representantes de los gobiernos. Las ONG y los Estados pueden hacer recomendaciones para la acción tanto a la OSCE como a los Estados participantes. Todas las recomendaciones realizadas durante la Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana quedan reflejadas en el informe final de la reunión. Las recomendaciones presentadas por las ONG y los Estados participantes se presentan después a la Reunión de Consejo Ministerial de la OSCE en diciembre del mismo año.
    Las recomendaciones pueden también tener un seguimiento a través de Reuniones Suplementarias de la Dimensión Humana sobre temas específicos, o de Seminarios de Dimensión Humana.

    1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

    Durante las sesiones plenarias de las Reuniones sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana, se estudian los avances realizados por los Estados participantes en la implementación de sus compromisos de dimensión humana. Las ONG tienen la oportunidad de participar en el diálogo y señalar los incumplimientos de estos compromisos, así como realizar recomendaciones concretas que se incluirán en el informe definitivo de la reunión.

    2. A qué Estados es aplicable

    Los mecanismos se aplican a los Estados participantes en la Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa (OSCE). Esto incluye no sólo a Estados europeos, sino también varios Estados de Asia Central más EEUU y Canadá. Puede consultarse una lista de los Estados participantes en http://www.osce.org/who/83.

    3. Quién puede presentar información

    Cualquier ONG participante en una Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana puede presentar información.

    4. Cuándo presentar la información

    Las ONG que deseen participar en una Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana pueden presentar declaraciones, documentos de base, y cualquier otro material escrito para su distribución a través del Sistema de Distribución de Documentos de la OSCE (DDS).

    5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

    El objetivo de las Conferencias sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana es estudiar los avances realizados por los Estados participantes en la implementación de sus compromisos de dimensión humana. Por ellos es importante hacer referencia a los compromisos pertinentes asumidos cuando se presenta la información.

    La Oficina de la OSCE para las Instituciones Democráticas y Derechos Humanos (ODIHR) ha publicado unas Directrices de Preparación de Documentos (ver http://www.osce.org/odihr/92511). Según estas directrices, sólo será publicado en el Sistema de Distribución de Documentos de la OSCE el material de los participantes que estén registrados y presentes en la correspondiente Conferencia sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana. Por ello, presentar documentación solamente es útil cuando se puede asistir a la Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana.

    Cuando se hagan recomendaciones debe expresarse claramente a quién van destinadas, si a la OSCE o a los Estados participantes.

    Organizar una actividad paralela

    Las actividades paralelas durante la Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana son una buena oportunidad para destacar una cuestión concreta en un contexto más informal. Las ONG pueden organizar actividades paralelas durante las comidas, los descansos o las tardes. La ODIHR publicará el programa de actividades paralelas en su calendario de conferencia, si recibe la información a tiempo.

    Hacer presión sobre las delegaciones

    Durante la Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana también es posible reunirse y hacer presión sobre las delegaciones del propio país o de otro país.

    La información de las Reuniones sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana en http://www.osce.org/odihr/44078.

    66. Que ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

    La información presentada por las organizaciones participantes en una Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana se publicará en el sitio web de la OSCE.

    Las recomendaciones se incluirán en informe de la Reunión sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana en su formulario original, pero también puede ser resumidas en el informe de la conferencia a cargo del relator.

    7. Historial del uso del mecanismo

    En los últimos años, varias ONG que trabajan en el campo de la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar han presentado información y han asistido a Reuniones sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana. La Internacional de Resistentes a la Guerra presentó información en 2003 (ver http://wri-irg.org/co/osce-rep.htm), pero después no participó en la propia reunión, por lo que la información presentada no está disponible en el sitio web de la OSCE.

    La Asociación Europea de Testigos Cristianos de Jehová presenta información regularmente y asiste a las Reuniones sobre la Implementación de la Dimensión Humana.

    Datos de contacto: 
    OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights Ul. Miodowa 10 00-251 Warsaw Poland Tel: +48 22 520 06 00 Fax: +48 22 520 06 05 E-mail: office@odihr.pl
    Lecturas complementarias: 

    None

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Consejo de Europa: Comisario para los Derechos Humanos

    Resumen

    El cargo de Comisario para los Derechos Humanos del Consejo de Europa fue creado por una resolución del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa el 7 de mayo de 1999.
    Según el contenido de su mandato, el Comisario para los Derechos Humanos, además de promover los derechos humanos y apoyar la educación en derechos humanos, tiene la misión de “identificar posibles carencias en la legislación y las prácticas de los Estados miembros respecto al cumplimiento de los derechos humanos tal como está plasmado en los instrumentos del Consejo de Europa, promover la puesta en práctica efectiva de estas normas por parte de los Estados miembros y prestarles asistencia , con su consentimiento, en los esfuerzos para paliar tales carencias”.
    Como parte de su mandato, el Comisario lleva a cabo visitas a todos los Estados miembros del Consejo de Europa para vigilar y evaluar la situación de los derechos humanos.
    Aunque de acuerdo al artículo 1(2) del mandato “el Comisario no aceptará denuncias individuales”, puede sacar conclusiones acerca de violaciones de los derechos humanos en casos individuales. Parte del mandato del Comisario para los Derechos Humanos es trabajar junto a personas u organizaciones de Derechos Humanos de los países miembros del Consejo de Europa, y reunirse con un amplio abanico de defensores de los derechos humanos durante sus visitas a países, y elaborar y hacer públicos informes sobre la situación de los defensores de los derechos humanos.
    El Comisario para los Derechos Humanos publica opiniones, informes sobre visitas a países, informes temáticos, e informes anuales respecto a la situación de los derechos humanos en los Estados miembros del Consejo de Europa.

    1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

    El Comisario para los Derechos Humanos puede admitir información sobre la violación de los derechos humanos durante la visita a un país o cuando elabore el informe de un país. Las violaciones de derechos humanos también pueden incluirse en un informe temático, por ejemplo sobre libertad de expresión.

    2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

    El mecanismo se aplica a todos los Estados miembros del Consejo de Europa. Puede consultarse una lista de los Estados miembros en http://www.coe.int/aboutCoe/index.asp?page=47pays1europe&l=en.
    Los tratados e instrumentos de derechos humanos aplicables dependen de qué instrumentos han sido ratificados por el Estado en cuestión. Los tratados de derechos humanos más importantes son la Convención para la Protección de los Derechos Humanos y las Libertades Fundamentales (Convención Europea de Derechos Humanos – ver http://conventions.coe.int/treaty/Commun/ChercheSig.asp?NT=005&CM=7&DF=0... para el estado de las ratificaciones) y la Carta Social Europea (ver http://conventions.coe.int/treaty/Commun/ChercheSig.asp?NT=035&CM=7&DF=0... para el estado de las ratificaciones).

    3. Quién puede presentar información

    El Comisario para los Derechos Humanos puede recibir información de cualquiera, pero sobre todo de ONG y defensores de los derechos humanos.

    4. Cuándo presentar la información

    La información puede presentarse en cualquier momento, pero es recomendable comprobar la agenda del Comisario para los Derechos Humanos y presentar la información antes de una visita programada a un país, si es posible solicitando al mismo tiempo una reunión durante la visita del Comisario.

    5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para la presentación de la información

    No existen reglamentos especiales para la presentación de la información.

    Cuando se presenta la información es recomendable hacer referencia a los instrumentos de derechos humanos del Consejo de Europa relevantes que sean aplicables al Estado en cuestión. Puesto que el mandato del Comisario para los Derechos Humanos no incluye la presentación de denuncias individuales, los casos individuales de violaciones de derechos humanos deben usarse como ejemplos para destacar pautas de violaciones de derechos humanos.

    6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

    Como no existe un procedimiento regular de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados, no existen periodos regulares para que el Comisario para los Derechos Humanos publique sus informes.
    Para las informaciones presentadas antes de la visita a un país, sobre todo si ha habido un seguimiento con una reunión con el Comisario, es de esperar que el Comisario incluya los asuntos en su informe sobre la visita. Pueden encontrarse los informes sobre los países y otras publicaciones del Comisario relacionadas con países en http://www.coe.int/t/commissioner/Activities/countryreports_en.asp.
    Las situaciones graves de violaciones de derechos humanos pueden incluirse en el Informe Anual o Trimestral del Comisario, o incluso en una Opinión. Los informes anuales y trimestrales de actividad se encuentran disponibles en http://www.coe.int/t/commissioner/WCD/annualreports_en.asp#, y las Opiniones del Comisario están disponibles en http://www.coe.int/t/commissioner/WCD/searchOpinions_en.asp#.

    Seguimiento

    Si el Comisario para los Derechos Humanos ha aceptado abordar el tema de la objeción de conciencia y ha hecho recomendaciones, es importante aportar información sobre la puesta en práctica de las recomendaciones presentadas al Comisario. El Comisario publica informes de seguimiento de las visitas a países unos años después de la visita, y es altamente recomendable aprovechar esta oportunidad para señalar el no cumplimiento de las recomendaciones.

    7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

    Aunque hasta donde saben las personas que han elaborado esta guía no se ha usado este mecanismo para la objeción de conciencia, el Comisario para los Derechos Humanos abordado el tema, por ejemplo en una entrada de su blog del 2 de febrero de 2012 (ver http://commissioner.cws.coe.int/tiki-view_blog_post.php?postId=205).

    Datos de contacto: 
    Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights Human Rights’ Defenders Programme Council of Europe F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex, FRANCE Fax + 33-3 90 21 50 53 Email: commissioner@coe.int Sitio web: http://www.coe.int/t/commissioner/default_en.asp
    Informes

    None

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos

    Resumen

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos de Estrasburgo es un tribunal internacional de derechos humanos encargado de atender las denuncias relacionadas con supuestas violaciones del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos.

    Antes de presentar una denuncia ante el Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos deben haberse agotado los recursos legales nacionales, a menos estos se prolonguen injustificadamente o sean inefectivos. La denuncia no debe haber sido enviada a ningún otro procedimiento internacional de investigación o resolución de conflictos.

    Si la denuncia es admitida a trámite y el Tribunal toma una decisión sobre el fondo del caso, hallará que ha existido o no una violación de artículos concretos del Convenio Europeo. En una causa en que el Tribunal concluya que existe violación del Convenio, normalmente también impondrá una compensación.

    Las decisiones del Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos son legalmente vinculantes para el Estado en cuestión.

    1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos toma primero una decisión sobre la admisibilidad a trámite de la denuncia, según sus propios criterios. Si el Tribunal admite a trámite la denuncia, dicta a continuación sentencia sobre el fondo del caso, ya sea concluyendo que existe violación del Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos, y normalmente imponiendo una reparación, o no hallando ninguna violación del Convenio.

    Después de una sentencia contra un Estado, el Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa vigilará el cumplimiento de la sentencia por parte del Estado implicado.

    Acción urgente:

    El Tribunal puede, según el artículo 39 de su Reglamento, imponer medidas provisionales a cualquier Estado parte del Convenio. Las medidas provisionales son medidas urgentes que, de acuerdo con los procedimientos establecidos por el Tribunal, se adoptan sólo donde existe riesgo inminente de daños irreparables. Las medidas provisionales se toman sólo en situaciones limitadas: los casos más habituales son aquellos en los que hay temor de
    - amenazas a la vida (situación recogida en el artículo 2 del Convenio) o
    - malos tratos prohibidos por el artículo 3 del Convenio (prohibición de tortura y trato degradante o inhumano).

    Puede encontrarse más información sobre las medidas provisionales en la guía práctica publicada por el Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos: http://www.coe.int/aboutCoe/index.asp?page=47pays1europe&l=en.

    2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos se aplica a todos los 47 Estados miembros del Consejo de Europa. Los derechos establecidos en el Convenio deben ser garantizados no sólo a sus propios ciudadanos, sino también a todas las personas dentro de su jurisdicción. Puede consultarse la lista de Estados miembros del Consejo de Europa en http://www.coe.int/aboutCoe/index.asp?page=47pays1europe&l=en.

    3. Quién puede presentar la información

    Las denuncias (llamadas “solicitudes”) sólo pueden ser presentadas por las víctimas de supuestas violaciones de derechos humanos o sus representantes legales. Sin embargo, las ONG o entidades legales pueden ser también víctimas de violaciones de derechos humanos (por ejemplo, en el caso de la libertad de asociación).

    4. Cuándo presentar la información

    Antes de presentar una denuncia ante el Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos, debemos haber agotado todas las vías legales domésticas. Esto quiere decir que tienen que haberse agotado todas las apelaciones a los tribunales presentes en el país, incluido –si es posible- un recurso al Tribunal Supremo o Constitucional. En estos recursos, tiene que haberse planteado la parte sustancial de las violaciones del Convenio Europeo (no el propio Convenio). Las solicitudes al Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos deben hacerse dentro de un plazo de 6 meses desde la fecha de la decisión definitiva a nivel nacional (generalmente la sentencia de la más alta instancia judicial). Pasado este plazo, el Tribunal no puede aceptar las solicitudes.

    5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar información

    Para presentar la solicitud inicial ante el Tribunal no es estrictamente necesario estar representado por un abogado. Sin embargo, puede ser recomendable contar ya con uno, pues esto puede incrementar las opciones de la solicitud. Alrededor del 90% de las solicitudes no son admitidas a trámite por el Tribunal. Se pueden encontrar formularios de solicitud en http://www.echr.coe.int/ECHR/EN/Header/Applicants/Apply+to+the+Court/App....

    En el sitio web del Tribunal Europeo puede consultarse una lista de criterios de admisibilidad en http://www.echr.coe.int/ECHR/EN/Header/Applicants/Apply+to+the+Court/Che....
    La primera solicitud al Tribunal Europeo debe incluir:

    • un breve resumen de los hechos y de nuestra denuncia;
    • indicación de cuáles de nuestros derechos contemplados en el Convenio Europeo han sido violados;
    • las instancias legales nacionales que hemos utilizado;
    • copias de las decisiones alcanzadas en nuestro caso por todas las autoridades públicas implicadas; y
    • la firma del solicitante o la del representante legal, más un formulario autorizando a éste a firmar en nombre del solicitante.

    Para que se admita a trámite una solicitud es importante que:

    • la solicitud esté elaborada por las víctimas o sus representantes legales;
    • la supuesta violación no haya sido previamente investigada por otro procedimiento internacional de resolución de conflictos, que -en el caso del Tribunal Europeo- son el Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas (procedimiento de presentación de denuncias individuales), el Comité sobre Libertad de Asociación de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo, y el Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detenciones Arbitrarias.
    • la víctima tiene que haber sufrido una “desventaja significativa” como consecuencia de la violación de sus derechos humanos..

    Antes de presentar una solicitud al Tribunal Europeo, se recomienda examinar la Guía Práctica de Criterios de Admisibilidad a Trámite publicada por el Tribunal (ver http://www.echr.coe.int/NR/rdonlyres/B5358231-79EF-4767-975F-524E0DCF2FB...).

    Las solicitudes deben enviarse por correo postal a la siguiente dirección:
    The Registrar
    European Court of Human Rights
    Council of Europe
    F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex.

    Las solicitudes pueden enviarse por fax primero, pero deben enviarse también por correo postal.

    Aunque la solicitud inicial puede hacerse en cualquiera de los idiomas oficiales de cualquier Estado miembro del Consejo de Europa, toda documentación posterior presentada al Tribunal Europeo después de que éste haya notificado al Gobierno en cuestión sus observaciones, debe estar en uno de los idiomas oficiales del Tribunal, es decir, en inglés o en francés.

    En cuanto el Tribunal haya notificado al Gobierno en cuestión sus observaciones, es imprescindible la presencia de un abogado.

    6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

    Tras la presentación de la solicitud al Tribunal Europeo, primero un juez único la estudia. Si el juez llega a la decisión de no admitirla a trámite y no ve necesario un examen adicional, puede tomar esa decisión. La persona solicitante será notificada por carta. La gran mayoría de los casos son declarado no admisibles a trámite por el juez único.

    Si el juez único halla la solicitud admisible a trámite, la remite a un Comité o a una Sala para posteriores exámenes.

    Un comité de tres jueces puede declarar no admisible a trámite la solicitud en cualquier etapa del procedimiento. Si la causa está bien apoyada en precedentes del Tribunal Europeo y no se piden nuevos exámenes, el comité puede declarar la solicitud admisible a trámite y dictar sentencia sobre el fondo de la causa. En ambos casos, la decisión del comité debe ser unánime.
    Las decisiones tomadas por un juez único o por un comité de tres jueces son definitivas.

    Solamente las causas que no son obviamente inadmisibles a trámite son notificadas al Gobierno del Estado en cuestión. Desde ese momento es obligatoria la representación legal.
    Usualmente, el procedimiento ante el Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos es únicamente escrito. Una vez que una Sala ha declarado admisible a trámite la solicitud, el Presidente de la Sala puede invitar a las partes de la causa a presentar observaciones y pruebas adicionales por escrito. Normalmente se da el mismo tiempo a ambas partes para que presenten información. Aunque es posible solicitar una audiencia, la decisión al respecto la toma la Sala.

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos introdujo un nuevo “procedimiento de sentencia piloto” en casos que muestren problemas estructurales o sistemáticos en un país parte del Convenio Europeo, y del cual el Tribunal ha recibido una gran cantidad de solicitudes similares. Si se selecciona una causa para el procedimiento de sentencia piloto, se trata con prioridad, mientras que el resto de las causas quedan en espera (más información disponible en el artículo 61 del Reglamento del Tribunal).

    Allí donde la Sala halle que ha existido violación de uno de los derechos protegidos por el Convenio Europeo de Derechos Humanos, puede también tomar la decisión de dictar una “satisfacción equitativa” (el pago de una compensación a la víctima), si se ha solicitado.

    Qué sucede tras la sentencia

    El Tribunal transmite la sentencia al Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa, que consulta con el país cómo ejecutar la sentencia. Como consecuencia de la supervisión del Comité, normalmente se hacen enmiendas a la legislación.

    Remisión a la Gran Sala

    Tanto el Estado implicado como la persona solicitante pueden solicitar que se remita la causa a la Gran Sala del Tribunal Europeo dentro de un plazo de tres meses después de la sentencia de una Sala. Es importante destacar en tal solicitud las cuestiones más graves relacionadas con la interpretación del Convenio Europeo, o los temas graves de importancia general.

    Un grupo de cinco jueces de la Gran Sala estudiará la petición únicamente en base al expediente de la causa, y la aceptará o la rechazará. No es necesario que se razone la denegación de la petición. Si la petición se acepta, la Gran Sala resolverá la causa mediante una sentencia.

    Cuánto tarda

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos tiene un gran número de causas atrasadas. Incluso en la primera etapa –la admisión o no a trámite- puede tardar fácilmente más de un año, y una decisión sobre el fondo del caso tardará considerablemente más. Aunque el Tribunal tiene como objetivo resolver las causas importantes en menos de tres años, es muy probable que tarden cinco años o más.

    7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

    El Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos y la antigua Comisión de Derechos Humanos (abolida en 1998) han sido usados en una serie de casos relacionados con la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar y a los gastos militares con desigual suerte.

    No antes de 2011, la Gran Sala del Tribunal de Europeo de Derechos Humanos revocó la jurisprudencia de la antigua Comisión de Derechos Humanos, y reconoció que el derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar se encuentra amparado por el artículo 9 del Convenio Europeo Bayatyan v. Armenia 23459/03). Desde entonces, el Tribunal Europeo ha consolidado su jurisprudencia con más causas procedentes de Armenia y Turquía.

    Previamente, el Tribunal Europeo no había visto causas planteadas por objetores de conciencia de acuerdo al artículo 9 del Convenio. En su sentencia en el caso del objetor de conciencia turco Osman Murat Ülke, el Tribunal dictaminó que el repetido encarcelamiento constituía una “muerte civil”, y por ello una violación del artículo 3 del Convenio Europeo (prohibición de tratos inhumanos y degradantes).

    Varios casos de objetores totales que rechazaban el servicio sustitutorio fueron no admitidos a trámite por la antigua Comisión Europea de Derechos Humanos (ver Johansen v. Norway
    al igual que otros casos que denunciaban la duración punitiva del servicio sustitutorio (ver Tomi Autio v. Finland (17086/90). Respecto a la última cuestión, la jurisprudencia de la antigua Comisión de Derechos Humanos es muy diferente de la del Comité de Derechos Humanos de Naciones Unidas (ver Foin v. France, 1999).a

    Datos de contacto: 
    European Court of Human Rights Council of Europe 67075 Strasbourg Cedex France Tel: +33-3-88 41 20 18 Fax: +33-3-88 41 27 30
    Lecturas complementarias: 
    Precedentes (Jurisprudencia)
    Título Date
    Tomi Autio vs. Finlandia (Solicitud nº 17086/90) - No admitido a trámite por la Comisión 06/12/1991

    Tomi Auti denunció discriminación debido a la duración punitiva del servicio sustitutorio en Finlandia. La Comisión llegó a la Conclusión de que “a efectos del Artículo 14 del Convenio, la diferencia de tratamiento es discriminatoria si no tiene justificación objetiva y razonable”, es decir, si no persigue “un objetivo legítimo”, o si no existe una “relación de proporcionalidad razonable entre los medios empleados y el objetivo que se busca realizar”.

    La Comisión quedó satisfecha de que el tratamiento diferencial en cuestión persiguiera un “objetivo legítimo”.

    Aunque la duración del servicio sustitutorio es considerablemente mayor que la del servicio militar, la Comisión, teniendo en cuenta el margen de apreciación del Estado, halló que el tratamiento diferencial en cuestión no supone una violación del Artículo 14 leído conjuntamente con el Artículo 9 del Convenio.

    H.; B. vs. Reino Unido (Solicitud nº 11991/86) 17/07/1986

    Decisión de no admisión a trámite relacionada con la objeción de conciencia fiscal al gasto militar.
    “El Artículo 9 protege principalmente la esfera de las creencias personales y los credos religiosos, es decir, el área que a veces es denominada fuero interno. Además, protege los actos que están íntimamente ligados a estas actitudes, como los actos de culto o devoción que son aspectos de la práctica de la religión o creencias en una forma generalmente reconocida.
    Sin embargo, al proteger la esfera personal, el Artículo 9 del Convenio no siempre garantiza el derecho a comportarse en la esfera pública de una manera que esté dictada por dichas creencias: por ejemplo negándose a pagar determinados impuestos porque parte de la recaudación obtenida puede ser destinada a gasto militar...
    La obligación de pagar impuestos es una obligación general que por si misma no tiene implicaciones de conciencia. Su neutralidad a este respecto queda también ilustrada por el hecho de que ningún contribuyente puede influir o determinar el fin al cual van destinados sus impuestos una vez son cobrados. Más aún, la competencia para recaudar impuestos está expresamente reconocida por el sistema del Convenio y está adscrita al Estado por el Artículo 1, Protocolo primero.
    La Comisión ha estudiado detenidamente los argumentos presentados por los solicitantes pero es incapaz de encontrar ningún factor que distinga esta solicitud de las citadas anteriormente o que le lleven a abandonar sus razonamientos previos. Por ello la Comisión concluye que no ha habido interferencia con los derechos de los solicitantes garantizados por el párrafo 1º, artículo 9 del Convenio. De lo cual se sigue que la denuncia está manifiestamente mal fundamentada, dentro del significado establecido por el párrafo 2º, Artículo 27 del Convenio.
    Por estos motivos, la Comisión NO ADMITE A TRÁMITE LA SOLICITUD.”

    Johansen vs. Noruega (Solicitud nº 10600/83) 14/10/1985

    Decisión de no admisión a trámite de la Comisión Europea de Derechos Humanos, relacionada con la objeción total.

    “En su condición de pacifista, el solicitante se opone al servicio militar y también objeta al servicio civil, puesto que el fin de dicho servicio es, en su opinión, garantizar el respeto por el servicio militar.
    (…)
    El solicitante ha denunciado un incumplimiento del Artículo 9 del Convenio, que ampara el derecho a la libertad de pensamiento, conciencia y religión para todo el mundo.

    A la hora de interpretar esta disposición, la Comisión ha tomado en consideración el párrafo 3º(b), Artículo 4 del Convenio, que inter alia provee que el “servicio exigido en lugar del servicio militar obligatorio” no debe estar incluido en el concepto de “trabajo forzado u obligatorio”. Puesto que el Convenio expresamente reconoce que se les puede exigir a los objetores de conciencia que realicen un servicio civil, está claro que el Convenio no garantiza un derecho a ser eximido del servicio civil (ver nº 7705/76, Dic. 5.7.77, D.R. 9 p. 196). El Convenio no impide que un Estado tome medidas para asegurar el cumplimiento del servicio civil, o imponga sanciones a aquellos que se niegan a cumplir dicho servicio.

    La Comisión se refiere a su conclusión bajo el párrafo 1º y declara que la detención del solicitante no puede considerarse contraria al Artículo 9 del Convenio.
    De lo cual se sigue que este aspecto de la solicitud está manifiestamente mal fundamentado según el significado del párrafo 2º, Artículo 27 del Convenio.”

    N. vs. Suecia (Solicitud nº 10410/83) - No admisión a trámite 10/10/1984

    El solicitante, pacifista, fue condenado por negarse a realizar el servicio militar obligatorio. No solicitó la posibilidad de realizar el servicio civil sustitutorio. Ante la Comisión ha denunciado ser víctima de discriminación, puesto que los miembros de varios grupos religiosos fueron eximidos del servicio mientras que los motivos filosóficos tales como ser pacifista no constituyeron razones válidas para liberarle de la obligación de prestar servicio en el ejército. La Comisión no admitió a trámite la solicitud. No encontró ningún indicio de violación del Artículo 14 en conjunción con el Artículo 9 del Convenio, declarando que no había sido discriminatorio limitar la exención completa del servicio militar y el servicio civil sustitutorio a los objetores de conciencia que pertenezcan a una comunidad religiosa que requiera de sus miembros disciplina estricta y general, tanto espiritual como moral.

    C. vs. Reino Unido (Solicitud nº 10358/83) 15/12/1983

    El solicitante denuncia que la ausencia de procedimientos mediante los que pueda invocar eficazmente el derecho a expresar sus creencias pacifistas dirigiendo una proporción de los impuestos pagados por él hacia finalidades pacíficas representa una violación de los Artículos 9 y 13 del Convenio. (…)
    La obligación de pagar impuestos es una obligación general que por si misma no tiene implicaciones de conciencia. Su neutralidad a este respecto queda también ilustrada por el hecho de que ningún contribuyente puede influir o determinar el fin al cual van destinados sus impuestos una vez son cobrados. Más aún, la competencia para recaudar impuestos está expresamente reconocida por el sistema del Convenio y está adscrita al Estado por el Artículo 1, Protocolo primero.
    De lo cual se sigue que el Artículo 9 no confiere al solicitante el derecho a negarse a someterse a la ley en base a sus convicciones. El funcionamiento de la legislación está previsto por el Convenio y se aplica en general y neutralmente en la esfera pública, sin menoscabo de las libertades amparadas por el Artículo 9. (…)

    X. vs. Reino Unido (Solicitud nº 10295/82) 14/10/1983

    La solicitante, pacifista, no quería que fracción alguna de su impuesto sobre la renta fuera utilizada con fines militares. Argumentaba que el hecho de que esto no estuviera permitido en el Reino Unido violaba el Artículo 9. (…)
    La obligación de pagar impuestos es una obligación general que por si misma no tiene implicaciones de conciencia. Su neutralidad a este respecto queda también ilustrada por el hecho de que ningún contribuyente puede influir o determinar el fin al cual van destinados sus impuestos una vez son cobrados. Más aún, la competencia para recaudar impuestos está expresamente reconocida por el sistema del Convenio y está adscrita al Estado por el Artículo 1, Protocolo primero.
    De lo cual se sigue que el Artículo 9 no confiere al solicitante el derecho a negarse a someterse a la ley en base a sus convicciones. El funcionamiento de la legislación está previsto por el Convenio y se aplica en general y neutralmente en la esfera pública, sin menoscabo de las libertades amparadas por el Artículo 9.

    X. vs. Alemania (Solicitud nº 7705/76) 05/07/1977

    El solicitante, Testigo de Jehová y reconocido como objetor por las autoridades competentes, se negó a incorporarse al servicio civil sustitutorio. Fue condenado por “abandono de destino”, pero se le concedió una suspensión de la ejecución de la condena para negociar un acuerdo para desarrollar un trabajo social en un hospital u otra institución, lo cual le eximiría del servicio civil. Al no poder llegar a dicho acuerdo, su sentencia fue ejecutada en diciembre de 1976. El solicitante denunció la revocación de la suspensión de la ejecución de la sentencia, basándose en el Artículo 3 (prohibición de tratos inhumanos y degradantes), Artículo 7 (sin ley previa no hay delito) y el Artículo 9.
    La Comisión no admitió a trámite la solicitud. En concreto halló que puesto que el Artículo 4 § 3(b) reconocía expresamente que a los objetores de conciencia se les podía exigir el cumplimiento de un servicio civil en sustitución del servicio militar obligatorio, debía inferirse que el Artículo 9 no implicaba un derecho a ser eximido del servicio civil sustitutorio. En relación a la denuncia según el Artículo 7, la Comisión subrayó que era competencia del legislador nacional definir los delitos que podían ser penalizados y concluyó que la Convención no impedía que un Estado impusiera sanciones a aquellos que se negaban a realizar el servicio civil. Además, teniendo en cuenta la duración de la sentencia del solicitante, su aplazamiento y su libertad provisional, la Comisión no halló ningún argumento convincente en apoyo de sus acusaciones de violación del Artículo 3.

    X. vs. Austria (Solicitud nº5591/72) 02/04/1973

    El solicitante denunció su condena por los tribunales austriacos por haberse negado a realizar el servicio militar obligatorio en base a sus creencias religiosas como católico.
    La Comisión no admitió a trámite la solicitud, hallando en concreto que el Artículo 4 § 3(b) del Convenio, que eximía de la prohibición de trabajo forzado u obligatorio a “cualquier servicio de carácter militar o, en el caso de los objetores de conciencia, en los países donde fueran reconocidos, el servicio exigido en lugar del servicio militar obligatorio”, mostraba claramente que los Estados tenían la elección de reconocer o no a los objetores de conciencia, y en caso afirmativo, estipular algún tipo de servicio sustitutorio. El Artículo 9, como certificaba el Artículo 4 § 3(b), no imponía a los Estados la obligación de reconocer a los objetores de conciencia y, por consiguiente, adoptar disposiciones especiales para el ejercicio de sus derecho a la libertad de conciencia y religión en la medida en que afectaba a sus servicio militar obligatorio. De lo cual se seguía que estos Artículos no evitaban que los Estados que no habían reconocido la objeción de conciencia castigaran a quienes se negaban a hacer el servicio militar.

    Grandrath vs. Alemania (Solicitud nº 2299/64) 12/10/1966

    El Sr. Grandrath, pastor de los Testigos de Jehová, fue “objetor total”, buscando ser eximido tanto del servicio militar como del civil. Denunció su condena penal por negarse a realizar el servicio civil sustitutorio y denunció que estaba siendo discriminado en comparación con los pastores católicos y protestantes, que quedaban exentos de este servicio.
    La Comisión Europea de Derechos Humanos estudió la solicitud de acuerdo al Artículo 9 (libertad de religión) y al Artículo 14 (prohibición de trabajo forzado u obligatorio). La Comisión concluyó que no había habido violación del Convenio, ya que los objetores de conciencia no tenían derecho a ser eximidos del servicio militar, y que cada Estado contratante podía decidir si otorgaba o no dicho derecho. Si se otorgaba dicho derecho, podía exigírseles a los objetores que realizaran un servicio civil sustitutorio, y no tenían derecho a ser eximidos de éste.

    Case of Adyan and others v. Armenia (Application no. 75604/11) 12/10/2017

    Four Jehovah’s Witnesses, Adyan and others were imprisoned for refusing alternative civilian service, which they did not believe was of a genuinely civilian nature since it was supervised by the military authorities. They were called up in May and June 2011, imprisoned in 2011 and 2012, and all released in the general amnesty that took place in October 2013.

    The applicants alleged that their convictions had violated the guarantees of Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights (which provides a right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion). The Court unanimously upheld this.

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales: procedimientos de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados

    Resumen

    El Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales (ESCR) es un mecanismo basado en tratado en el que un grupo de 15 expertos en derechos humanos estudian informes anuales de los Estados partes de la Carta Social Europea. La Carta Social Europea es un tratado del Consejo de Europa (aprobado en 1961 y revisado en 1996) que garantiza derechos como la no discriminación. La Carta Social Europea no protege el derecho de objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. Sin embargo, puede ser pertinente en casos de servicio civil sustitutorio de naturaleza punitiva en países donde se reconoce la objeción de conciencia.
    El Comité determina si la legislación y las prácticas de los Estados partes están en concordancia con la Carta y elabora “conclusiones” para los informes nacionales.

    1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

    El Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales evalúa el informe de los Estados partes de la Carta Social Europea de 1961, el Protocolo Adicional de la Carta Social Europea de 1988, o la Carta Social Europea revisada de 1995. Tras una decisión del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa en 2006, dentro del actual sistema de informes, se han dividido las disposiciones tanto de la Carta Social Europea de 1961 como de Carta Social Europea Revisada de 1996 en cuatro grupos temáticos: “Empleo, formación e igualdad de oportunidades” (que incluye los artículos 1 y 2, enormemente relevantes para el servicio sustitutorio de los objetores de conciencia), “Salud, seguridad social y protección social”, “Derechos laborales”, y “Niños, familias y migrantes”. Los Estados presentan un informe sobre las disposiciones relativas a uno de los cuatro grupos temáticos una vez al año. En consecuencia, cada disposición de la Carta es revisada una vez cada cuatro años. Puede consultarse un calendario con los ciclos de revisión en http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/socialcharter/ReportCalendar/Calend....

    El Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales evalúa el informe del Estado teniendo en cuenta las disposiciones pertinentes dela Carta Social Europea, y publica sus evaluaciones y conclusiones en un informe que está disponible al final del ciclo de revisión en el sitio web del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales (ver http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/socialcharter/Conclusions/Conclusio...).

    2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

    El mecanismo se aplica a los Estados que han ratificado una de las revisiones relevantes de la Carta Social Europea, más quizás los protocolos adicionales:

    3. Quién puede presentar información

    Pueden presentar información al Comité de Derechos Sociales tanto las ONG internacionales con estatus participante en el Consejo de Europa como los sindicatos nacionales.
    El procedimiento para obtener el estatus participante se estableció en la resolución Res(2003)8 del Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa (ver http://www.coe.int/t/ngo/Articles/Resolution_2003_8_en.asp).
    Además, se les pide a los Estados partes que remitan una copia de su informe a organizaciones nacionales miembros de organizaciones internacionales de emprendedores y sindicatos invitados, según el artículo 27, a estar representadas en las reuniones del Comité Gubernamental.

    4. Cuándo presentar la información

    Es recomendable presentar la información después de la presentación de un informe por parte de un Estado.

    5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

    Desde 2006, la presentación de informes se ha dividido en cuatro áreas temáticas. Es importante que la información presentada haga referencia al informe del Estado en cuestión, y se limite a las disposiciones de la Carta Social Europea que se estén tratando en el ciclo de revisión pertinente.
    Se pide a los Estados que presenten sus informes para el 31 de octubre de cada año, y se supone que el Comité Europeo para los Derechos Sociales publica sus conclusiones a finales del año siguiente.
    Se puede consultar el calendario de revisiones en: http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/socialcharter/ReportCalendar/Calend....

    6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

    El Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales designará un Relator a continuación de la presentación del informe de un Estado, cuya labor es hacer los preparativos para el examen del informe de un Estado.
    Como parte del procedimiento de presentación de informes, el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales o un subcomité formado para dicha tarea, puede organizar una reunión con representantes del Estado en cuestión, al que pueden ser invitadas organizaciones y sindicatos trabajadores internacionales, así como –si está de acuerdo el Estado en cuestión- representantes de sindicatos nacionales del Estado a examen. El Secretario Ejecutivo redactará después unas conclusiones provisionales.
    A continuación de la sesión, el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales aprueba sus conclusiones al final de cada ciclo de supervisión.
    Si el Estado no toma ninguna medida después de una decisión del Comité hasta el punto de incumplir la Carta, el Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa dirigirá una recomendación a dicho Estado, pidiéndole cambiar la situación de su legislación o de sus prácticas.

    7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

    Las personas que han elaborado esta guía no tienen conocimiento de ninguna organización de objetores de conciencia u ONG de derechos humanos que hayan planteado la cuestión del servicio sustitutorio punitivo en el marco del procedimiento de presentación de informes por parte de los Estados del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales. Sin embargo, el ECSR ha tratado el tema en varios informes, basándose en el párrafo 2º, artículo 1 de la Carta Social Europea: el derecho a trabajar, o más concretamente, el compromiso de “proteger eficazmente el derecho del trabajador a ganarse la vida mediante un trabajo libremente elegido”. El ECSR considera la duración punitiva del servicio sustitutorio como “una restricción desproporcionada del ‘derecho del trabajador a ganarse la vida mediante un trabajo libremente elegido’”, y por ello como una violación del párrafo 2º, artículo 1 de la Carta Social Europea.

    Datos de contacto: 
    Secretariat of the European Social Charter Council of Europe Directorate general of Human Rights and Legal Affairs Directorate of Monitoring F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex Tel. +33-3-88 41 32 58 Fax. +33-3-88 41 37 00
    Conclusiones
    Título Date
    Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales: Conclusiones 2006 (Moldavia) 14/03/2007

    “Servicio en lugar del servicio militar
    Según el informe la duración del servicio alternativo es de 24 meses, mientras que la duración del servicio militar es de 12 meses. El Comité recuerda que según el Artículo 1§2, la duración del servicio alternativo no puede alcanzar más de una vez y media la duración del servicio militar. Por ello, el Comité concluye que la situación no es conforme al Artículo 1§2 de la Carta Revisada.”

    Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales: Conclusiones 2006 (Rumanía) 14/03/2007

    "Servicio en sustitución del servicio militar
    En sus anteriores conclusiones, el Comité consideró que la situación no era conforme ya que la duración del servicio alternativo al servicio militar, 24 meses en vez de 12, era excesiva. Consideró que los 12 meses adicionales, durante los cuales las personas afectadas eran privadas del derecho a ganarse la vida mediante un trabajo emprendido libremente, iba más allá de los límites razonables en relación a la duración del servicio militar.
    No ha habido cambios en esta situación, por lo que el Comité concluye que la situación no es conforme a la Carta Revisada a este respecto.”

    Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales: Conclusiones 2004 (Chipre) 01/07/2004

    “Servicio requerido en sustitución del servicio militar
    En su última conclusión, el Comité consideró que la duración del servicio que reemplazaba al servicio militar obligatorio era excesiva (Conclusiones XVI-1, pp. 98). El informe hace referencia a este respecto a un documento que tenía que haber sido enviado por el Ministerio de Defensa al Comité, pero del cual no hay rastro. Por ello, considera que la situación no ha cambiado.”

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales: procedimiento de presentación de reclamaciones colectivas

    Resumen

    El Protocolo Adicional de 1995 a la Carta Social Europea establece un sistema de Reclamaciones Colectivas, que principalmente permite a los sindicatos de trabajadores o sus organizaciones internacionales presentar reclamaciones colectivas al Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales en relación al no cumplimiento de la Carta. El procedimiento de presentación de Reclamaciones Colectivas no establece un sistema de denuncias individuales, sino que está dirigido a casos de no cumplimiento de la legislación o las prácticas de los Estados de las disposiciones de la Carta Social Europea. Si tiene éxito, el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales elaborará una decisión declarando que el Estado en cuestión no cumple la Carta Social Europea, y el Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa dictará a continuación una resolución.

    1. Resultados probables del uso del mecanismo

    Si la reclamación es admitida a trámite y apoyada por el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales, el Comité resolverá respecto al fondo de la reclamación. Esta decisión será transmitida a las partes de la reclamación y al Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa.
    De acuerdo al artículo 9 del Protocolo Adicional de 1995, si el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales “concluye que la Carta no ha sido aplicada de manera satisfactoria, el Comité de Ministros deberá aprobar, por mayoría de dos tercios del total de votos, una resolución dirigida a la Parte Contratante en cuestión. En ambos casos, el derecho a voto se limitará a las Partes Contratantes de la Carta”.
    La decisión del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales se hará pública una vez el Comité de Ministros haya aprobado una resolución o, como muy tarde, cuatro meses después de que la decisión haya sido comunicada al Comité de Ministros. Antes de ello, las partes de la denuncia no tienen permiso para publicar la decisión.

    2. A qué Estados es aplicable el mecanismo

    Este mecanismo se aplica solamente a los Estados partes del Protocolo Adicional de 1995 de la Carta Social Europea que Prevé un Sistema de Reclamaciones Colectivas (ver http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/empleo/anexos/ccarl/2_267_1.pdf). Puede consultarse el estado de las ratificaciones en http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/Commun/ChercheSig.asp?NT=158&CM=8&DF=&....

    3. Quién puede presentar información

    Los artículos 1 y 2 del Protocolo Adicional definen con detalle el tipo de organizaciones que pueden presentar una reclamación colectiva. Éstas son:
    1. las ONG internacionales con estatus de participante en el Consejo de Europa, y organizaciones representativas de empresarios y sindicatos; y
    2. los sindicatos nacionales de trabajadores (si el Estado lo permite) pueden presentar una reclamación en cualquier momento.
    Además del estatus de participante, la ONG internacional tiene que ser competente en el área en cuestión y estar en una lista publicada por el Consejo de Europa.
    La lista de organizaciones está disponible en http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/socialcharter/OrganisationsEntitled....

    4. Cuándo presentar la información

    Las reclamaciones pueden presentarse en cualquier momento.

    5. Reglamentos especiales o consejos para presentar la información

    La Sección VIII del Reglamento del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales trata en detalle el procedimiento de presentación de Reclamaciones Colectivas. Con escasas excepciones, las Reclamaciones Colectivas tienen que presentarse en uno de los idiomas oficiales del Consejo de Europa (francés e inglés).
    Las reclamaciones deben entregarse por escrito, tienen que ir firmadas por un representante de la ONG, y deben manifestar claramente qué disposiciones de la Carta Social Europea no cumple el Estado en cuestión y por qué.

    6. Qué ocurre con la información presentada (cuánto tardará)

    Las reclamaciones se registran en la Secretaría, y a continuación se designa a un miembro del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales para que actúe como Relator.

    Al Estado en cuestión se le pide en primer lugar que presente por escrito observaciones en cuanto a la admisibilidad a trámite de la Reclamación. El reclamante puede entonces ser invitado a contestar a las observaciones presentadas por el Gobierno. Sin embargo, el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales puede decidir también no hacer partícipes al Estado y al reclamante si la reclamación es claramente admisible o inadmisible a trámite. La decisión sobre la admisión a trámite se publica en el sitio web del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales.

    Cuando se admite a trámite la reclamación, el Comité estudia el fondo del caso. El Comité pide primero al Estado en cuestión que presente por escrito sus observaciones sobre el fondo del asunto. A continuación, el reclamante tiene la oportunidad de hacer comentarios sobre las observaciones presentadas por el Estado.

    A las organizaciones internacionales de sindicatos y otros Estados partes de la Carta Social Europea Revisada se les da la opción de hacer comentarios sobre la información presentada. Si una de las partes de la reclamación lo solicita, el Comité decidirá si convocar una audiencia.

    Finalmente, el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales toma una decisión sobre el fondo de la reclamación. Esta decisión incluye los motivos considerados, y puede que también las opiniones discrepantes. Las decisiones se transmiten entonces al Comité de Ministros del Consejo de Europa, que aprobará una resolución basada en la decisión del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales.
    La decisión del Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales se hace pública una vez dicta su resolución el Comité de Ministros o, como muy tarde, cuatro meses después de que la decisión se transmita al Comité de Ministros. Antes de esto, las partes de la reclamación no tienen permitido hacer pública la decisión.

    7. Historial de uso del mecanismo

    Hasta ahora (julio de 2010) solamente se ha usado una vez el Comité Europeo de Derechos Sociales en relación con la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar. En el caso de Grecia, Quaker Council of European Affairs presentó una reclamación (nº 8/2000) respecto al tratamiento de los objetores de conciencia en el país. El 25 de abril de 2001, el Comité concluyó que Grecia violaba la Carta Social Europea al alejar a los objetores de conciencia del mercado laboral durante un tiempo desproporcionadamente mayor que a los soldados, y por ello infringía el párrafo 2ª del Artículo 1 de la Carta.

    Datos de contacto: 
    Secretariat of the European Social Charter Council of Europe Directorate general of Human Rights and Legal Affairs Directorate of Monitoring F-67075 Strasbourg Cedex Tel. +33-3-88 41 32 58 Fax. +33-3-88 41 37 00
    Lecturas complementarias: 
    Decisións

    None

    A Conscientious Objector's Guide to the International Human Rights System

    Contacts of the organisations

    War Resisters' International

    5 Caledonian Road
    London N1 9DX
    Britain
    Tel.: +44-20-7278 4040
    Fax: +44-20-7278 0444
    Email: concodoc@wri-irg.org
    Web: http://wri-irg.org

    Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva

    13 Avenue du Mervelet
    1209 Geneva
    Switzerland
    Tel.: +41-22-748 4800
    Fax: +41-22-748 4819
    quno@quno.ch
    http://www.quno.org

    Conscience and Peace Tax International

    Bruineveld 11
    3010 Leuven
    Belgium
    cpti@cpti.ws
    http://cpti.ws

    Centre for Civil and Political Rights (CCPR Centre)

    Rue de Varembé 1
    PO Box 183
    1202 Geneva
    Switzerland
    Tel: +41-22-33 22 555
    info@ccprcentre.org
    http://www.ccprcentre.org